Elm & Magnolia brings fine dining to Old Town Spring

Lobster ravioli ($22): Lobster-stuffed ravioli is topped with a lobster-basil cream sauce, roasted asparagus and tomatoes. (Emily Lincke/Community Impact Newspaper)
Lobster ravioli ($22): Lobster-stuffed ravioli is topped with a lobster-basil cream sauce, roasted asparagus and tomatoes. (Emily Lincke/Community Impact Newspaper)

Lobster ravioli ($22): Lobster-stuffed ravioli is topped with a lobster-basil cream sauce, roasted asparagus and tomatoes. (Emily Lincke/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Hong Kong Ribs ($14): A nod to Chinese cuisine, pork ribs are smothered in a sesame-ginger glaze and Chinese 5-Spice. (Emily Lincke/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Spicy garlic shrimp ($10): Lightly fried shrimp topped in chili-garlic aioli and pepperoncini is a staple at Elm & Magnolia. (Emily Lincke/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Specialty cocktails (starting at $4): From the Calypso lemonade to a variety of boozy options, Elm & Magnolia serves a wide selection of beverages. (Emily Lincke/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Owners Joe and Maria Macri opened Elm & Magnolia in November 2019. (Emily Lincke/Community Impact Newspaper)
Owning a restaurant requires a lot of passion and sacrifice, Maria Macri said, adding that she and her husband, Joe, have put a lot of both into Elm & Magnolia—a restaurant, bar and event venue the couple owns in Old Town Spring.

Maria, an outgoing New Jersey native who grew up working at her father’s restaurant, and Joe, a reserved former Manhattan chef who trained at the Culinary Institute of America, said they are opposites in many ways. However, the two share a passion for fine dining.

“When Joe and I met, I just think it was an excellent collaboration,” Maria said.

After meeting in New Jersey, the couple felt compelled to move to Texas in 2012 after visiting friends in The Woodlands for a weekend.

“We went back up north, and then 10 days later, I was driving back down with my knife kit and two chef coats,” Joe said.


Shortly after relocating, the couple opened the Black Sheep Bistro and The Italian Joint prior to opening Elm & Magnolia in November 2019. Due to hardships from Hurricane Harvey and the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, however, the Macris decided to close their first two restaurants and focus solely on Elm & Magnolia.

The restaurant serves fine-dining cuisine, such as duck with fried goat cheese and fig jelly, and regularly hosts live music and wine dinners.

Like most small-business owners, the pandemic presented many challenges for the Macris as they had to learn to operate during mandated shutdowns without a drive-thru and adjust their menu to make to-go service easier.

Now, 18 months later, their struggle is to find more people to hire. Joe is the only one cooking in the restaurant’s kitchen, while Maria makes drinks at the bar.

"Some restaurants need seven guys to execute what [Joe] is doing, but we had to survive,” Maria said.

Along with their love of food, the couple has a passion for switching up their menu.

“I think that’s us,” Joe said. “We like to change it up.”

Elm & Magnolia

206 B. Magnolia St., Spring

346-382-3014

www.elmnmagnolia.com

Hours: Wed.-Fri. 5-9 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., closed Mon.-Tue.
By Hannah Zedaker

Editor, Spring/Klein & Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood

Hannah joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in May 2016 after graduating with a degree in journalism from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. In March 2019, she transitioned to editor of the Spring/Klein edition and later became the editor of both the Spring/Klein and Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood editions in June 2021. Hannah covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Hannah served as associate editor of The Houstonian, interned with Community Impact Newspaper and spent time writing for the Sam Houston State University College of Fine Arts and Mass Communication and The Huntsville Item.