Department of State Health Services launches Texas Public Health Vaccine Scheduler

The new tool will give Texans one place to sign up for a COVID-19 vaccine through multiple health departments, including the eight DSHS public health regions—which provides public health services to nearly 200 Texas counties—as well as more than a dozen local health entities statewide. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
The new tool will give Texans one place to sign up for a COVID-19 vaccine through multiple health departments, including the eight DSHS public health regions—which provides public health services to nearly 200 Texas counties—as well as more than a dozen local health entities statewide. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

The new tool will give Texans one place to sign up for a COVID-19 vaccine through multiple health departments, including the eight DSHS public health regions—which provides public health services to nearly 200 Texas counties—as well as more than a dozen local health entities statewide. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

The same day COVID-19 vaccine eligibility opened up to Texans age 16 and older, the Texas Department of State Health Services announced the launch of a new tool known as the Texas Public Health Vaccine Scheduler to help expedite the vaccination process.

According to a March 29 news release, the new tool will give Texans one place to sign up for a COVID-19 vaccine through multiple health departments, including the eight DSHS public health regions—which provides public health services to nearly 200 Texas counties—as well as more than a dozen local health entities statewide. Participating public health entities include:

  • Bastrop County Health Authority

  • Cameron County Emergency Management

  • City of Garland Health Department

  • City of Laredo Health Department

  • LaSalle County Regional Health Authority

  • Lavaca County Health Authority

  • Marshall-Harrison County Health District

  • Parker County Health Authority

  • Rockwall County Health Authority

  • San Angelo-Tom Green County Health Department

  • Throckmorton Rural Health Clinic

  • Uvalde Health Authority


Through an online portal, Texas residents will be able to create a profile that includes their contact information, demographic details and preferred time and day and days of the week for an appointment. According to the release, within a day of creating a profile those who are eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine will be matched with the next available appointment within their home county and preferred times. If no appointments are available matching a person's criteria, the scheduler will continue to search for appointments as new clinics are scheduled and contact individuals when an appointment becomes available.


"The Texas Public Health Vaccine Scheduler will not replace all COVID-19 vaccine registration in the state," the release reads. "Many entities—including pharmacies, medical practices and some public health departments—are operating their own registration systems and will continue to do so. People who want to be vaccinated should continue to look for available vaccine at those providers, as well."

To create an online profile through the Texas Public Health Vaccine Scheduler, eligible Texans can visit getthevaccine.dshs.texas.gov or call 833-832-7067 from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. daily for assistance.

For more information about the COVID-19 vaccine in Texas, click here.
By Hannah Zedaker

Editor, Spring/Klein & Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood

Hannah joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in May 2016 after graduating with a degree in journalism from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. In March 2019, she transitioned to editor of the Spring/Klein edition and later became the editor of both the Spring/Klein and Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood editions in June 2021. Hannah covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Hannah served as associate editor of The Houstonian, interned with Community Impact Newspaper and spent time writing for the Sam Houston State University College of Fine Arts and Mass Communication and The Huntsville Item.