UPDATE: Fort Bend County voters pass $218 million mobility bond

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Updated 10:44 a.m. Nov. 8

All vote centers reporting, Fort Bend County voters supported the $218 million mobility bond with 70 percent, or 18,919 residents in favor of the referendum. Thirty percent, or 8,174 voters, opposed it, according to unofficial voting results.

“I am very pleased that the voters saw fit to support the mobility bond with such a high percentage of yes votes,” Fort Bend County Judge Robert Hebert said. “Apparently it tells us we are doing the right thing.”

Updated 10:41 p.m. Nov. 7

With all precincts reporting, voters supported Fort Bend County’s $218 million mobility bond referendum, according to unofficial voting results.

Seventy percent, or 18,654 residents, voted in favor of the bond while 30 percent, or 7,987 opposed it.
The bond will be used to fund 63 projects across Fort Bend County’s four precincts. The total cost of all the projects is set at $388 million, of which the county will cover 56.2 percent of, according to county documents.

Updated 8:47 p.m. Nov. 7

With 9,542 votes, supporters of the $218 million mobility bond still lead opponents, according to updated unofficial voting results.

Seventy percent of voters support the bond, while 4,001 individuals, or 30 percent of voters, oppose it with 49 percent of precincts reporting.

All results are unofficial until canvassed.

Original post 7:25 p.m. Nov. 7. 

A majority of early voters are in favor Fort Bend County’s $218 million mobility bond Nov. 7, according to unofficial voting results.

With 8,442 votes, 71 percent of early voters cast their ballot in favor of the bond, while 3,380, or 29 percent, voted against it.

The $218 million bond referendum is the county’s fourth since 2000. The county’s last bond election was in 2013. Continued growth of the county has made it a necessity to issue a bond election every few years, according to Fort Bend County Judge Robert Hebert.

If approved by voters, the $218 million bond will be used to fund 63 road construction projects that Hebert has said in past interviews are critical for the county to complete in the next five to seven years.

Commissioners worked to revise the list of projects from $500 million to the $218.5 million voters approved. The total cost of all the projects is set at $388 million, of which the county will cover 56.2 percent of, according to county documents.

As promised, commissioners kept the property tax rate of $0.453 per $100 valuation. Precinct 2 Commissioner Grady Prestage explained in a previous interview with Community Impact Newspaper how the county’s growth and development made it possible to not raise the tax rate despite the bond and Hurricane Harvey.

“Property values are going up, and more land is being bought and developed,” Prestage said. “That new revenue will be there to pay for debt service going forward. The improvements we’re making will spur further increases in value.”

The finalized list of proposed projects is available online.

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COMMENT
  1. What a bunch of suckers, you Fort Bend voters (and tax payers) are! Developers (usually from outside Fort Bend) willy-nilly create new developments to make a fast buck at the expense of our flood-absorbing green spaces, then complain that there are not sufficient roads to service them. Now we’re stuck paying for roads and bridges the developers should have paid for. Idiots!

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Originally from Houston, Rebecca joined Community Impact in June 2017 to report on the Richmond area. She covers the Fort Bend County Commissioners Court, city government, education, business and transportation.

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