Friendswood issues hurricane warning

hurricane, storm, wind, trees, palm trees
The city expects to experience hurricane-force winds between 74-110 MPH within the next 36 hours, according to a news release. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

The city expects to experience hurricane-force winds between 74-110 MPH within the next 36 hours, according to a news release. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Friendswood issued a hurricane warning the morning of Aug. 25. The city expects to experience hurricane-force winds between 74-110 MPH within the next 36 hours, according to a news release.

As Hurricane Laura moves closer to making landfall, residents should plan for a Category 1 or 2 hurricane, make preparations to protect life and property, prepare for considerable wind damage and move to shelter before winds become dangerous, according to the release.


Potential damage from the hurricane includes roof damage; window, door and garage door failures; severe damage and some destruction to mobile homes; increased damage from airborne projectiles; and more, the release reads.

After the storm, some areas may be uninhabitable for weeks. Trees may be toppled with fences and roadway signs blown over. Some roads and bridges may be impassable from large debris, and there may be large areas with power outages, according to the release.

Hurricane Laura is expected to hit the Texas and Louisiana border Wednesday evening between San Luis Pass, Texas, and Morgan City, Louisiana. There is danger of life-threatening storm surges and dangerous waves from San Luis Pass to the mouth of the Mississippi River, and the threat of flash flooding along streams and river will increase Wednesday night into Thursday, according to the National Weather Service.
By Jake Magee

Editor, Bay Area & Pearland/Friendswood

Jake has been a print journalist for several years, covering numerous beats including city government, education, business and more. Starting off at a daily newspaper in southern Wisconsin, Magee covered two small cities before being promoted to covering city government in the heart of newspaper's coverage area. He moved to Houston in mid-2018 to be the editor for and launch the Bay Area edition of Community Impact Newspaper. Today, he covers everything from aerospace to transportation to flood mitigation.