Brazoria County 288 Expressway to open Nov. 16

The expressway project has been in the making for nearly 20 years. (Screenshot courtesy Brazoria County)
The expressway project has been in the making for nearly 20 years. (Screenshot courtesy Brazoria County)

The expressway project has been in the making for nearly 20 years. (Screenshot courtesy Brazoria County)

The Brazoria County 288 Expressway will be open for travelers starting Nov. 16, according to a media release from the office of County Judge Matt Sebesta.

The expressway extends 5.2 miles from County Road 58 north to the Brazoria County-Harris County line at Clear Creek. The opening will be in conjunction with the Harris County section of the 288 Expressway that spans 10.3 miles from Clear Creek, to just south of Beltway 8, to the US 59/69 Split, per the release.

From its opening until Nov. 29, the expressway will be free to travel from Brazoria County through Harris County. Tolling will begin for the Brazoria and Harris sections Nov. 30, at which time travelers will pay $1.80 in tolls to travel the length of the Brazoria County portion of the expressway, per the release.

The expressway will be tag only, with no cash booths. Residents can get their EZTag online through the Harris County Toll Road Authority website.

This project has been in the making for almost 20 years, Sebesta said in the release, and it will help with congestion relief on Highway 288.


“We are excited to see the Brazoria County Expressway completed, allowing our residents to spend less time in traffic and more time at home with their families,” he said in the release.

A grand opening event was not held due to COVID-19, but the county put together a kickoff video, which is viewable here.

By Colleen Ferguson

Reporter, Bay Area

A native central New Yorker, Colleen worked as an editorial intern with the Cy-Fair and Lake Houston | Humble | Kingwood editions of Community Impact Newspaper before joining the Bay Area team in 2020. She covers public education, higher education, business and development news in southeast Houston. Colleen graduated in 2019 from Syracuse University and the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she worked for the university's independent student newspaper The Daily Orange. Her degrees are in journalism and Spanish language and culture. When not chasing a story, Colleen can be found petting cats and dogs, listening to podcasts, swimming or watching true crime documentaries.