Brooklyn Pizzeria

When the Shahini family moved to Houston from Brooklyn in 2005, they brought more than their love for pizza. They brought a pizzeria concept and New York ingredients with them as well.



"There are only three things we really care about—service, cleanliness and food," said Jimmy Shahini, who owns Brooklyn Pizzeria along with his two brothers, Ilir and Sammy, and their father, Mike. "This is very important for us. The difference is all about the ingredients. Whatever you pay for you get, and we spend a lot of money to get the best. To make good pizza is very hard."



For more than 25 years, Mike Shahini ran a pizza parlor in Brooklyn, New York. When the family moved to Houston in 2005, Jimmy said they had a difficult time finding restaurants that could make the pizza they grew up with.



In 2006, the family opened Brooklyn Pizzeria in Humble. Six years later, they opened their second location along Hwy. 6 in Missouri City.



"We had a line out the door [in Humble] so we knew we were doing this right," Jimmy said. "We picked Missouri City because they needed good pizza. I enjoy working here, and I enjoy living here. Since our first week we were so busy, and it has stayed that way."



There are several differences between traditional pizza and New York-style pizza. New York boasts large, thin-crust slices and pies. The most popular topping on a New York slice is basic cheese or sometimes pepperoni, Jimmy said.



"In New York, we do not call it pizza," he said. "We call it a pie. If our customers do not know that, we try to teach them. The sauce we make in house. Even the water we bring in from Brooklyn because these are two things that make a great pizza—that and, of course, the cheese."



The menu at Brooklyn Pizzeria is simple but hits all the basics. Pastas, such as lasagna, manicotti, baked ziti and spaghetti with meatballs, are all $6.47 and feature homemade sauces. Pizza by the slice starts at $1.85 and ranges in price based on toppings. There are several appetizers available including Buffalo wings ($6.47) and garlic knots ($4.16).



"Everything we make we create from scratch," Jimmy said. "It may take 10 or 20 minutes but I am sure you are going to enjoy [it]. I tell everyone, 'do what you love.' I love to cook."



One menu item in particular has become increasingly popular. Derived from a recipe passed down from Shahini's mother, Drita, the restaurant's Lemoncello cake has become a guest favorite, selling about 10 whole cakes each week.



"Nobody makes this like we do," Jimmy said. "Mainly because we make it ourselves. It is my mother's recipe. It is all about the filling. We need two days in advance to make this cake."



Since first opening in 2012, the Missouri City location has increased sales by nearly 40 percent, Jimmy said. Looking to the future, the Shahinis said they would like to continue expanding into other areas of Houston.



"We are looking at expansion plans now," Jimmy said. "At the end of this year, we will decide which direction we want to grow."



Slices and pies



For more than 25 years, the Shahinis operated a pizza parlor in Brooklyn. In 2005, the family packed up and moved to Houston and brought with them a love for New York-style pizza. By 2006, they had opened their first Houston pizzeria in Humble. Today, the Shahinis operate a second location in Missouri City where they focus on quality ingredients and traditional slices and pies.



To keep the taste as authentic as possible, the Shahinis use recipes from home and have their water delivered from Brooklyn.



Menu recommendations



  • Starters: Garlic knots—$4.16

  • By the slice: Cheese—$1.85; one topping—$2.32; two toppings—$2.54

  • Whole pies: $9.24–$19.40

  • Pastas: Lasagna—$6.47

  • Desserts: Lemoncello—$3.24

4717 Hwy. 6 Missouri City 281-499-0044



www.bkpizzeria.com



Hours: Sun.–Sat. 11 a.m.–10 p.m.

SHARE THIS STORY


MOST RECENT

As of April 3, Fort Bend County is reporting 221 confirmed cases of the coronavirus, up from 194 just one day prior. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Latest coronavirus news in Sugar Land, Missouri City: Confirmed cases in Fort Bend County top 200

Here are the latest coronavirus-related developments from around Sugar Land, Missouri City, Fort Bend County and Fort Bend ISD.

Houston Airport System officials expect March passenger data to be significantly lower than in other months. Foot traffic at IAH was light March 24. (Emily Heineman/Community Impact Newspaper)
TSA limits checkpoints at George Bush Intercontinental Airport; Houston Airport System expects significant decline in March passengers

With low passenger travel amid the coronavirus pandemic, Transportation Security Administration checkpoints at George Bush Intercontinental Airport have been consolidated to make better use of resources and personnel, Houston Airport System officials said.

Prices are more of an indicator of real estate activity during the coronavirus pandemic than location or geography, a local Realtor said.
ROUNDUP: 5 recent coronavirus stories from the South Houston area readers should know

Catch up on some of the latest coronavirus updates for the South Houston area below.

The $2 trillion federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act—also known as the CARES Act—provides millions of dollars in relief to small businesses nationwide. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce shares information about small-business relief programs

Community Impact Newspaper sat in on the chamber's webinar in order to share answers to frequently asked questions about the CARES Act.

Volunteers unload food donations for the Montgomery County Food Bank. (Courtesy Drive West Communications)
ExxonMobil makes $250,000 donation to local food banks

The energy company said the Houston Food Bank will receive $200,000, including $50,000 in gasoline gift cards. The Montgomery County Food Bank will also receive $50,000.

The University of Houston at Sugar Land will offer third-year business classes starting in the fall. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)
University of Houston’s Sugar Land campus to offer junior-level business courses this fall

Bauer Dean Paul Pavlou said the decision to expand Bauer classes to the Sugar Land campus was in part because more than 25% of students enrolled at Bauer are from the Fort Bend County area.

(Beth Marshall/Community Impact Newspaper)
PEOPLE FEATURE: Former intern Mike Goodrum steps into Sugar Land city manager role

Formerly the city manager of Coral Springs, Florida, Goodrum got his start in city government as an intern for the Sugar Land Parks & Recreation Department.

Left to right: Salim Nathani, Noureen Nathani and Sadruddin Currimbhoy are members of Bright Offerings' board. Bright Offerings aims to economically empower people through apprenticeship programs. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)
NONPROFIT: Bright Offerings connects candidates to companies and colleges for apprenticeships

Bright Offerings, a Sugar Land-based nonprofit, has worked to economically empower 75 job candidates through its apprenticeship program in the past two years.

Over the last decade, Fort Bend County’s population grew from 584,699 to 811,688. (Courtesy Pexels)
Fort Bend County one of fastest-growing counties in Texas, United States last decade

In the last decade, Fort Bend County's population grew by 38.8%, making it the fifth-fastest-growing county in the state by percent growth.

The employees of The Adventure Begins Comics, Games & More gather their characters together in "Animal Crossing: New Horizons." (Kate Looney/The Adventure Begins Comics, Games & More)
5 recent business stories from the Houston area readers should know

Read updates on how local businesses are reacting in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

Prices are more of an indicator of real estate activity during the coronavirus pandemic than location or geography, a local Realtor said.
Q&A: Houston-area Realtor describes changes in business during coronavirus outbreak

Prices are more of an indicator of real estate activity during the coronavirus pandemic than location or geography, a local Realtor said.

This is a test kit for COVID-19 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Courtesy National Institutes of Health)
UT Physicians opens coronavirus testing location in Missouri City

Individuals must have an order from their health care provider and call to make an appointment before arriving for testing.