Candidate Q&A: Meet the 2 candidates running for Humble City Council Place 1

Incumbent Charles "Andy" Curry and candidate Eric Lacy are running for Humble City Council Place 1. (Community Impact staff)
Incumbent Charles "Andy" Curry and candidate Eric Lacy are running for Humble City Council Place 1. (Community Impact staff)

Incumbent Charles "Andy" Curry and candidate Eric Lacy are running for Humble City Council Place 1. (Community Impact staff)



HOUSTON



Humble City Council Place 1




Responses have been edited for length and clarity.


*indicates incumbent





Charles "Andy" Curry*



Occupation: retired director of computer services for Humble ISD; computer consultant


Experience: I have a [Bachelor of Business Administration] and a [Master of Business Administration] with a major in accounting and a minor in computer science. I worked for the Humble school district for 28 years in the business administration department, where I gained extensive experience in financial and budgetary responsibility. I have served on Humble City Council since 1999, except for a two-year (2011-13) absence.


Contact: N/A




What is the biggest challenge the city faces, and how would you begin to address it?



CC: Flooding is probably the biggest challenge that the city faces. We are currently working with all of the local, state and federal agencies to acquire funding needed to improve flood water drainage in the city. Current projects include working with the San Jacinto River Authority and the city of Houston to get the dredging of the [San Jacinto] River completed and the lowering of the water level of Lake Houston when severe weather threatens possible flooding.



What part of the city's budget is overfunded or underfunded? How would you begin to address this?



CC: The city budget is very well-balanced. The city manager, finance officer and the department heads go through a very comprehensive budgeting process that ensures that all the departments have funds available for the needs of the department to ensure that the city can be maintained. The police and fire departments are the largest part of the budget, which is necessary to provide a safe environment for the citizens of Humble.



How do you plan to involve residents in the decision-making process in the city?



CC: City Council meetings are open to the public and the agendas are posted on the city’s website. Residents can contact the city secretary and ask to [be] added to the agenda to be able to address their concerns. There is a time slot on the agenda for the first meeting of the month where the citizens can sign up to speak to council. I would also like to see a page added to the website to inform the citizens about current and future projects that are currently being worked on or being considered and a monthly or quarterly newsletter that could be sent out with the water bills.









Eric Lacy



Occupation: owner, True Love Childcare, which has two day cares in the city of Humble; pastor, True Love Church


Experience: My organizations have worked for 10 years serving Humble through backpack giveaways, turkey giveaways as well as giving kids toys at Christmas. I personally have served this community as a YMCA board member. This experience has qualified me to see Humble as a viable and resourceful community, and it has sparked my desire to serve Humble greater.






What is the biggest challenge the city faces, and how would you begin to address it?



EL: I see two challenges as a Humble resident. One challenge the city faces is addressing the flood issue that causes issues at my residence. The budget is addressing issues in Blacks [Branch], etc., [but] it doesn’t address the Lakeland subdivision. I look forward to addressing those issues as water stands in my neighborhood. I want to see more community involvement in local politics. The beauty of democracy rest in the strength of all of its people.



What part of the city's budget is overfunded or underfunded? How would you begin to address this?



EL: We need more funding in: 1) Investing more in revitalizing the local downtown community. We should begin making the area more attractive for retail business. Biking lanes could help Humble. 2) The city should allocate resources to let citizens know what is going on by updating the website, streaming City Council meetings and investing in a community liaison that promotes vital community relationships. 3) Make sure our emergency personnel are equipped to serve us well.



How do you plan to involve residents in the decision-making process in the city?



EL: Being people together is always the best course of action. I would suggest adding committees to the city of Humble that help search for solutions. I think we should also appoint a committee that consists of community leaders, local pastors, local business owners as well as a delegates from the local community and [homeowners associations] to make sure we move forward in the best interest of all the Humble community stakeholders.


By Kelly Schafler

Managing editor, South Houston

Kelly joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in June 2017 after majoring in print journalism and creative writing at the University of Houston. In March 2019, she transitioned to editor for the Lake Houston-Humble-Kingwood edition and began covering the Spring and Klein area as well in August 2020. In June 2021, Kelly was promoted to South Houston managing editor.