Local officials, community members mourn death of former Humble ISD Superintendent Guy Sconzo

Former Humble ISD Superintendent Guy Sconzo died from cancer April 21. Local officials and former colleagues mourned his loss. (Courtesy Humble ISD)
Former Humble ISD Superintendent Guy Sconzo died from cancer April 21. Local officials and former colleagues mourned his loss. (Courtesy Humble ISD)

Former Humble ISD Superintendent Guy Sconzo died from cancer April 21. Local officials and former colleagues mourned his loss. (Courtesy Humble ISD)

Local officials and community members are mourning the death of former Humble ISD Superintendent Guy Sconzo, who died April 21 from cancer. Those who knew him described him as a great friend, mentor and a man who radiated positivity.

Sconzo served as HISD superintendent for 15 years from 2001-16. During his time as superintendent, he saw the opening of 14 schools and helped the district manage its rapidly increasing enrollment numbers, according to the district.

Bonnie Longnion, who served on the HISD board of trustees from 1988-2013, was part of the board that chose Sconzo as superintendent in 2001 when he came from Oklahoma City Public Schools, according to the district.

"I have never known any educational leader that was more skilled at getting the job done," Longnion said in a statement. "He was student and teacher centered. He was respected, admired and treasured throughout our community, state and nation."

Houston Mayor Pro Tem Dave Martin, who served 10 years on the board with Sconzo from 2004-14, said Sconzo loved being a husband, father and grandfather. Martin said he was was a great collaborator with the school board, often calling the seven board members and himself the "team of eight," Martin said.



"I never heard him have a bad word to say about anyone, and I've never, ever seen him in a bad mood. I'm sure he had bad moods, but I've never seen that side of him, and we spent a lot of time together," Martin said. "I've never seen him anything but positive in everything he did. I wish I was more like Guy Sconzo in many, many ways."

Although Sconzo was unafraid to make his voice heard when it came to education, Martin said he was always respectful and kind to others. If Martin and Sconzo ever did disagree, Sconzo would take the time to write him a handwritten letter the next day, Martin said.

"He made you feel better about yourself than you really deserved to feel," he said. "It was magic—he was magical. And I'm just sick he's no longer with us."

Most recently, Sconzo served as executive director of the Fast Growth School Coalition, an education advocacy group. State Rep. Dan Huberty, R-Houston, who also served on the HISD board of trustees from 2006-10 when Sconzo was superintendent, said via email that Sconzo was a mentor, friend and gentleman. Huberty said his relationship with Sconzo strengthened when Sconzo worked for the Fast Growth School Coalition.

"He touched so many lives, and made you feel like you were the most important person when engaging you. He was and is our friend forever," Huberty said. "While I will miss him dearly ... I will celebrate his life by being thankful for the time we had with him and not the time we will not."

By Kelly Schafler

Managing editor, South Houston

Kelly joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in June 2017 after majoring in print journalism and creative writing at the University of Houston. In March 2019, she transitioned to editor for the Lake Houston-Humble-Kingwood edition and began covering the Spring and Klein area as well in August 2020. In June 2021, Kelly was promoted to South Houston managing editor.