Katy ISD's fall 2020 reopening plan includes new bell schedule

 Katy ISD
Katy ISD is changing instructional start and end times for the 2020-21 school year to accommodate enhanced cleaning and disinfecting procedures for school buses. (Jen Para/Community Impact Newspaper)

Katy ISD is changing instructional start and end times for the 2020-21 school year to accommodate enhanced cleaning and disinfecting procedures for school buses. (Jen Para/Community Impact Newspaper)

Katy ISD published a webpage July 13 with information about how students, teachers and staff will return to school this fall amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The first day of school remains Aug. 19, and no changes have been made to the 2020-21 instructional calendar approved by the board of trustees in December. A copy of the calendar is available here.

However, many other procedures have changed, including a new bell schedule to accommodate enhanced cleaning and disinfecting procedures for school buses.

Here are the new start and end times for daily instruction.

  • High school: 7:15 a.m.-2:35 p.m.

  • Elementary school, Group 1: 7:55 a.m.-3:05 p.m. Find the list of elementary schools in this group here.

  • Elementary school, Group 2: 8:25 a.m.-3:35 p.m. Find the list of elementary schools in this group here.

  • Junior high school: 8:55 a.m.-4:05 p.m.


Below are six other things to know about the 2020-21 semester at Katy ISD, according to the webpage.

These guidelines are for Phase 1, which is in effect until Sept. 24 for secondary campuses and until Oct. 15 for elementary campuses. More information on the guidelines is available here.

1. Course options


Students can attend their classes either virtually through the Katy Virtual Academy or in person.


A KISD certified teacher will teach the KVA classes using online curriculum resources, though some resources, such as technology devices, textbooks, library books and calculators, will be available for students to check out and take home.

Parents or guardians can enroll their children for KVA between July 20-Aug. 4.

“Students who elect to begin the school year enrolled in KVA may elect to return to in-person instruction at the end of a six-weeks (secondary) and nine-weeks (elementary) grading period,” the webpage states. “KVA enrolled students are not allowed to return to in-person instruction prior to the close of a grading period.”

KVA will follow the same grading guidelines as in-person instruction, and KISD’s grading guidelines for the 2020-21 school year remain the same. Student attendance will be taken daily for in-person and virtual instruction students.

For students enrolled for in-person instruction, new cleaning and social distancing procedures will be put in place for lunch and other daily activities.

More information about how students can participate in person for career and technical education courses is forthcoming.

2. Employee procedures


The district is requiring all employees to self-screen daily for coronavirus symptoms and to report on-site to their assigned work location.

If employees shows symptoms, they are expected to stay home and notify their supervisor and human resource leave specialist.

Professional development and other staff gatherings will be held virtually if social distancing cannot be maintained.

These guidelines for employees become effective Aug. 3.

3. Face masks


Masks will be required for all staff and students in grades 4-12, and they are encouraged for students in preschool through third grade.

4. Student services


Students receiving special services, such as special education, should direct their questions to kvaspecialprograms@katyisd.org or specialedquestions@katyisd.org.

Additionally, a character trait program and employee training will be implemented to support students’ social and emotional well-being. Counselors and licensed specialists in school psychology are also available to assist students and their families.

5. Extracurricular activities


In-person and virtual learning will offer opportunities for students to be involved in co-curricular and extracurricular programs.

In-person programs will follow the guidelines from the University Interscholastic League. KVA students can access activities remotely.

6. Reporting COVID-19 cases


The webpage only stated the following about how confirmed coronavirus cases at district sites will be reported: “Katy ISD has a standard response in place in the event of a confirmed COVID-19 at a specific location. In the event your work site is impacted, the staff at the impacted site will receive an email update no later than 5 p.m. on the day the COVID-19 case is reported.”
By Jen Para
Jen joined Community Impact Newspaper in fall 2018 as the editor of the Katy edition. She covers education, transportation, local government, business and development in the Katy area.


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