Houston city buildings, some METRO services planned to shut down ahead of June 2 march for George Floyd

The June 2 march will culminate with a rally at the steps of Houston City Hall. (Courtesy city of Houston)
The June 2 march will culminate with a rally at the steps of Houston City Hall. (Courtesy city of Houston)

The June 2 march will culminate with a rally at the steps of Houston City Hall. (Courtesy city of Houston)

Ahead of the June 2 march with members of George Floyd's family through downtown Houston, several city services are planning to shut down early in the afternoon.

The march is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m. at Discovery Green, 1500 McKinney St., and proceeding to City Hall.

The municipal courts building and the Houston Police Department building will close at noon.

Houston Public Works, 611 Walker St., the Julia B. Ideson Library Building, City Hall, City Hall Annex and the Houston Permitting Center will close at 1 p.m.

In addition, the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County said several routes through downtown will be affected and that travelers should plan for delays.


Park & Ride outbound service will end at 1 p.m. and until crowds have cleared the area, METRO said.

METRORail Purple and Green lines will be suspended from the EaDo/Stadium stop to the Theater District starting at noon until the area is cleared.

Red Line service will be suspended from Wheeler to Burnett stations at noon until the area is cleared.

Local bus routes with stops in downtown Houston will use detours and to avoid the area starting at noon until the area is cleared.

All of the downtown and near-downtown Bcycle stations are also shut down until further notice.
By Matt Dulin
Matt joined Community Impact Newspaper in January 2018 and is the City Editor for Houston's Inner Loop editions.


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