Kinder Foundation seeds $3 million for new Trees for Houston campus

A new permanent campus for Trees for Houston will include 1.5 acres that will feature an on-site tree nursery, office space and an education center. (Courtesy Trees For Houston)
A new permanent campus for Trees for Houston will include 1.5 acres that will feature an on-site tree nursery, office space and an education center. (Courtesy Trees For Houston)

A new permanent campus for Trees for Houston will include 1.5 acres that will feature an on-site tree nursery, office space and an education center. (Courtesy Trees For Houston)

Trees For Houston, the Houston nonprofit that plants, protects and promotes trees throughout the Greater Houston area, will be able to build a new permanent campus in Houston’s Garden Oaks area just outside the Loop thanks to a $3 million gift from the Kinder Foundation.

The Kinder Campus at 2001 W. 34th St., Houston, will break ground this winter. When complete, the 1.5 acre site will feature an on-site tree nursery, office space and an education center, expanding the nonprofit’s capacity to distribute more trees to constituents and to provide educational programming for children and adults, the nonprofit announced April 22.

“Trees For Houston is indebted to our major donors in generously supporting our effort to positively impact Houston’s green infrastructure,” said Barry Ward, Executive Director of Trees For Houston, in the announcement. “The tree nursery on the Kinder Campus will be a game-changer in increasing our growing capacity to meet the needs of those we serve, including local municipalities, parks, schools, nonprofits, community partners and individuals.”

The campus is currently in the planning phase. The nonprofit’s Taking Root capital campaign now enters the public phase looking to reach $8.8 million in total investment—for land and buildings. Already $6.5 million has been raised with a combination of funding from the Kinder Foundation and three other major gifts, including $1 million from Kyle and John Kirksey Sr., $750,000 from Chevron, and $500,000 from the Ruth and Ted Bauer Family Foundation and the C.T. Bauer Foundation.

The office building will bear the names of Kyle and John Kirksey Sr., while the indoor/outdoor education center will be called the Bauer Education Center. The tree nursery will be named after Chevron, a corporate supporter.


The move allows Trees For Houston to consolidate operations into two tree farms, boosting annual tree distribution by 20% in one year. The Chevron tree nursery at the Kinder Campus will provide convenient access to free and low-cost trees for constituents and community partners during the week and on weekends.

The new campus will also provide the organization the facilities it needs to better engage on-site volunteers and provide educational opportunities for local school districts and community members.
By Hunter Marrow
Hunter Marrow came to Community Impact Newspaper in January 2020. Before that, Hunter covered local news in Ontario, OR for three years, covering municipal issues, crime, and education across Malheur County and across the border into Idaho.