PHOTOS: Scenes from the downtown Houston march for George Floyd

(Adriana Rezal/Community Impact Newspaper)
(Adriana Rezal/Community Impact Newspaper)

(Adriana Rezal/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Houston police officers were deployed throughout downtown June 2. (Adriana Rezal/Community Impact Newspaper)
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U.S. Representative Sheila Jackson Lee (orange) and Houston rapper Trae tha Truth (black cap) gave speeches at the June 2 march in honor of George Floyd. (Adriana Rezal/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Houston rapper Bun B participated in organizing the demonstration, along with fellow Houston rapper Trae tha Truth. (Adriana Rezal/Community Impact Newspaper)
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“While we’re protesting out here, we’re in the heat; it’s Texas, it’s 90 degrees outside,” demonstrator Rae said. “We want to make sure everyone stays hydrated, eats something, so that we can stay healthy and continue protesting for as long as possible.” (Adriana Rezal/Community Impact Newspaper)
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(Adriana Rezal/Community Impact Newspaper)
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“This wasn’t about me today, this was about justice for [George Floyd] and all of those who have lost their lives at the hands of police brutality but at the same time, [my] sign goes along with it,” demonstrator Phillip Grant said. “I’m a black man and I happen to be a gay man, so, all of my life, I’ve lived a double whammy." (Adriana Rezal/Community Impact Newspaper)
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(Adriana Rezal/Community Impact Newspaper)
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(Emma Whalen/Community Impact Newspaper)
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(Emma Whalen/Community Impact Newspaper)
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“To see this now is just unbelievable. We still have to fight. It’s been since slavery that we’ve been fighitng for rights and equality so I am going to continue to lend support and fight for change,” said attendee Alonzo Perrin. “To see all the different ethnicities here. It really shows that we are making progress but we have a long way to go.” (Emma Whalen/Community Impact Newspaper)
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(Emma Whalen/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Participants held fists in the air during a moment of silence. (Emma Whalen/Community Impact Newspaper)
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(Nola Z. Valente/Community Impact Newspaper)
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(Nola Z. Valente/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Houston police chief Art Acevedo poses with a child. (Nola Z. Valente/Community Impact Newspaper)
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(Nola Z. Valente/Community Impact Newspaper)
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(Nola Z. Valente/Community Impact Newspaper)
People of all ages, colors and creeds packed downtown Houston June 2 to march in memory of former Houston resident George Floyd.

Floyd grew up in Houston’s Third Ward and was killed in the custody of the Minneapolis Police Department on May 25. A video of his death, as well as news of the two high-profile deaths of Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor, both of whom were black, set off days of unrest throughout the U.S. beginning May 29.


The event included speeches by elected officials, members of Floyd's family and the Rev. William Lawson, a longtime civil rights leader in Houston.

View images from the event in the photo gallery above.


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