Houston BCycle program closes 12 locations at Memorial, Buffalo Bayou, Hermann parks

Houston Bcycle
The nonprofit Houston Bcycle is closing 12 of its bike-sharing stations in an effort to help prevent crowding at popular city parks. (Courtesy Pixabay)

The nonprofit Houston Bcycle is closing 12 of its bike-sharing stations in an effort to help prevent crowding at popular city parks. (Courtesy Pixabay)

Houston BCycle, the nonprofit that operates over 100 bike-sharing stations throughout the city, has closed 12 stations at several popular Inner Loop parks to prevent crowding amid the coronavirus outbreak, the organization announced April 3.

“We are closing stations in overcrowded parks, increasing sanitization measures and constantly urging our riders to wash their hands and maintain a safe distance from others, but riders must also do their part to ride safely,” Executive Director Beth Martin said in a news release.

The move comes after the organization recorded its highest monthly usage, with over 26,000 trips. It said about half of the trips originated from stations in city parks such as Memorial and Hermann parks. Houston officials have resisted closing parks completely but are urging all residents to practice safe social distancing.

The closed locations are: Sabine Bridge, Eleanor Tinsley Park, Spotts Park, Jackson Hill & Memorial, Lost Lake, Centennial Gardens, Hermann Park Lake Plaza, Hermann Park Bill Coats Bridge, Hermann Park/Rice University METRORail, Memorial Park Picnic Loop, Memorial Park Running Center and Stude Park.

Houston BCycle said it will also step up sanitization of all of its 800 bikes and would start weekly sprays of its stations using an EPA-approved disinfectant in addition to daily cleanings.


“We’re disinfecting touch points on our bikes and kiosks between four and eight times per day to further accommodate safe and efficient operation of the city's bike share program in these tough times," Director of Operations Doogie Roux said in the news release.
By Matt Dulin
Matt joined Community Impact Newspaper in January 2018 and is the City Editor for Houston's Inner Loop editions.


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