Harris County Pets announces 98.8% live release rate for 2020

Harris County Pets facilitates pet adoptions, foster placements and more. (Courtesy Harris County Pets)
Harris County Pets facilitates pet adoptions, foster placements and more. (Courtesy Harris County Pets)

Harris County Pets facilitates pet adoptions, foster placements and more. (Courtesy Harris County Pets)

Harris County Pets had a 98.8% live release rate in 2020, meaning nearly all healthy or treatable animals that came through the organization last year were adopted, transferred to other life-saving organizations or returned to their owners, according to a Jan. 28 press release.

This was an unprecedented achievement for the open-intake facility, despite challenges brought on by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, officials said. The live release rate at Harris County Pets, formerly known as Harris County Animal Shelter, was 15.5% in 2012 but has improved every year since.

“Despite the COVID restrictions our resource center has enforced since last March to ensure the safety of our customers and staff, we continue to receive the steadfast support from caring residents throughout the community,” said Michael White, Harris County veterinary public health director, in a statement. “The success of our live release rate is attributed to our adopters, fosters, rescue groups, partners, staff and volunteers who have rolled up their sleeves in these challenging times to save our pets and ensure they find a forever home.”


Located at 612 Canino Road, Houston, Harris County Pets offers low-cost veterinary care, pet licensing, microchip, vaccinations and other services for dogs and cats throughout the region. The organization’s new 50,000-square-foot facility opened last fall and can house 300 dogs and 225 cats. Learn more at www.countypets.com.
By Danica Lloyd

Editor, Cy-Fair

Danica joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in 2016. As editor, she continues to cover local government, education, health care, real estate, development, business and transportation in Cy-Fair. Her experience prior to CI includes studying at the Washington Journalism Center and interning at a startup incubator in D.C., serving as editor-in-chief of Union University's student magazine and online newspaper, reporting for The Jackson Sun and freelancing for other publications in Arkansas and Tennessee.