Houston Yoga & Ayurveda Wellness Center

Kapp built an outdoor yoga studio to teach classes in a natural setting.

Kapp built an outdoor yoga studio to teach classes in a natural setting.

Owner Sharon Kapp opened the Houston Yoga & Ayurveda Center nearly five years ago to help Houston residents take control of their health, naturally.

Born in India, Kapp said she grew up using nature as her pharmacy. Before opening the wellness center, she worked in a cardiology practice.

“I noticed that a lot of people were just getting sicker,” she said.

She decided to go back to school and study the ancient Indian practice of Ayurveda at the California College of Ayurveda. The system of natural healing is based on the principle that health is a balance between body, mind, spirit and environment.

Services offered at the center include yoga, massage, detox retreats, health consultations, herbal treatments and supplementation, and organic cooking classes. Classes and services are offered to people of any body type or skill level. For customers who cannot afford classes, Kapp offers them in exchange for a donation, asking the customers to only pay what they
can afford.

On 3 acres of naturally preserved woods, the center runs off of solar power and uses a septic system and well water.

Houston Yoga & Ayurveda Wellness Center Owner Sharon Kapp (far right) teaches yoga classes for all skill levels.[/caption]

“We’re trying to be green and preserve ecology,” Kapp said. “We haven’t cut down a single tree on the entire property.”

Outdoor amenities include walking trails, fishponds and an outdoor yoga facility.

Free-range chickens and ducks act as an organic form of pest control on the land, she said.

“[The center is] a natural habitat preservation where local residents and nature reside side-by-side, mutually supporting each other,” Kapp said.

An organic herb garden grows behind the center. Kapp also grows a variety of other plants used for medicinal purposes such as peepal trees, sage and aloe vera.

Inside the center is a gift shop that offers natural ayurvedic herbs and books, nontoxic cleaners, yoga items and metaphysical healing crystals.

In the future, Kapp wants to buy neighboring land and open a nondenominational community center that is open to the public.

“[We] look forward to being sponsored by local philanthropist groups and like-minded individuals who support our efforts to bring more nondenominational spiritual, health, wellness and fitness to the whole community,” she said.


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