Montgomery City Council considers growth opportunities

The Montgomery City Council heard a report from City Engineer Chris Roznovsky on Oct. 8.

The Montgomery City Council heard a report from City Engineer Chris Roznovsky on Oct. 8.

The city of Montgomery is considering opportunities to expand its city limits even as current projects seem undesirable to some City Council members.

At a regular meeting Oct. 9, City Engineer Chris Roznovsky showed Montgomery City Council an economic feasibility study on a proposed project from Promocon USA LLC on Old Dobbin Plantersville Road. Roznovsky said the project is for 168 single-family homes with an average value of $200,000. Because the project is outside the city limits, council would have to annex the area and then rezone it for this development. He said the development would potentially cost the city approximately $1.3 million and generate approximately $128,000 in taxes.

The construction and build-out process will take approximately three years, according to Roznovsky. However, the developer would need to take several steps to meet the standards of the city, such as variances for the lot sizes and a traffic impact study. He also said the Montgomery Planning and Zoning Committee designated the area in its future land use plan as a low-density residential area with less compact lots.

“From a logistical standpoint, there’s a lot going on with this one. … It’s outside the box; it’s different than what previously envisioned by staff,” Roznovsky said.

The biggest point of contention among council was the fact the tract would be considered a part of the city but would not use city water and instead be provided water by the Dobbin-Plantersville Water Supply Company. Council Member Rebecca Huss expressed discomfort at providing all of the citizen’s needs but not their water.

“It’s incumbent on us to actually make their homes habitable and safe, but we can’t do that because we can’t control the water,” Huss said. “I mean … you call your water supplier if you have a problem? That just doesn’t seem reasonable. You call your police department; you call your city. And we just say, ‘We can’t help you’? I just don’t see that as being at all a position we can live with.”

Roznovsky said much of the land to the south of the city is under Dobbin-Platersville’s service, and the company is not willing to part with the land. But as the city grows, dealing with split water providers will be an issue the council will have to address each time.

Council accepted the report, but the development will still need approval in the future.

Watershed, historical monuments and festivals

  • Council tabled a potential study into the Town Creek watershed and potential drainage improvements until City Administrator Richard Tramm has the chance to see if there are contractors willing to take up the $50,000 project.

  • Brenda Breaven of the Montgomery Historical Society gave council a presentation on the work the society does. The organization recently took stewardship of the Old Montgomery Cemetery in addition to its seven houses.

  • Council approved a revised road closure for OctoBEARfest on Oct. 12 due to local business owners’ objections. College Street will be closed from Liberty Street to McCowen Street, and McCowen Street will be closed from approximately 14356 Liberty St to College Street.


Mayor Sarah Countryman, Council Member John Bickford and Council Member John Champagne were all absent from the Oct. 8 meeting. The next regular City Council meeting is planned for Oct. 22 at 6 p.m. at 101 Old Plantersville Road, Montgomery.
By Andy Li
Originally from Boone, North Carolina, Andy Li is a graduate of East Carolina University with degrees in Communication with a concentration in Journalism and Political Science. While in school, he worked as a performing arts reporter, news, arts and copy editor and a columnist at the campus newspaper, The East Carolinian. He also had the privilege to work with NPR’s Next Generation Radio, a project for student journalists exploring radio news. Moving to Houston in May 2019, he now works as the reporter for the Conroe/Montgomery edition of Community Impact Newspaper.


MOST RECENT

Conroe Family Dentistry opened at its new location Aug. 3. (Courtesy Fotolia)
Conroe Family Dentistry now open at new location

The new office features four hygiene rooms, six operatories and two surgical rooms.

VGXI Inc. will move its headquarters to Conroe in 2022. (Courtesy VGXI Inc.)
Plasmid DNA manufacturer VGXI acquires land at Deison Technology Park in Conroe

VGXI first announced it was producing a vaccine for the coronavirus in early January with a clinical study beginning in late summer.

Montgomery County will operate a new COVID-19 testing site in The Woodlands this week. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Free COVID-19 testing site to open at Sterling Ridge Park and Ride in The Woodlands this week

The Montgomery County-sponsored site will operate from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 11-14.

Attendees sample a wide variety of global wines and cuisine during Wine & Food Week. (Courtesy Food & Vine Time Productions)
Wine & Food Week returns to The Woodlands and more news from the Houston area

Read business and community news from the Houston area.

The number of deaths reported has been declining for the past three week, according to the Texas Medical Center. (Community Impact staff)
Texas Medical Center: COVID-19 hospitalizations down 10% since Aug. 3

The number of deaths reported has been declining for the past three week, according to the Texas Medical Center.

The county's active case count fell to its lowest level in weeks, while resident deaths continue to rise. (Community Impact staff)
Five COVID-19 deaths reported in Montgomery County on Aug. 7; active case count continues to fall

The county's active case count fell to its lowest level in weeks, while resident deaths continue to rise.

A mother and daughter visit at Seasons Assisted Living & Memory Care in Conroe earlier in the pandemic. (Courtesy Seasons Assisted Living & Memory Care)
Texas allows limited visitations to nursing homes, long-term care facilities

Facilities that meet the requirements will allow limited visitations, but you still will not be able to hug or kiss your loved one.

HomeAid Houston partnered with Boys and Girls Country to open three cottages in Hockley. (Courtesy Boys and Girls Country)
Builders partner to serve homeless population through nonprofit HomeAid Houston

Since launching in 2003, the organization has helped provide 20,000 beds for homeless individuals in the Houston area.

Montgomery County saw a sharp decrease in its population of people experiencing homelessness. (Kaitlin Schmidt/Community Impact Newspaper)
DATA: Here's a breakdown of the homelesss population in Montgomery County

The coalition counted 145 people on its annual count, a 51% decrease from the 298 counted in 2019.

The 2020 U.S. census response rate is already lagging behind 2010 numbers, and officials said the shortened timeline only increases the chances of an undercount. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Shortened census timeline could shortchange Houston, its most vulnerable communities

The 2020 U.S. census response rate is already lagging behind 2010 numbers, and officials said the shortened timeline only increases the chances of an undercount.

The farm-to-table restaurant plans to create 90 jobs and offer familiar American meals. (Courtesy Whiskey Cake)
Whiskey Cake restaurant to open in The Woodlands and more Houston-area news

Read the latest business and community news from the Houston area.