Update: State Senate unanimously passes disaster relief bill package

The 86th session of the Texas Legislature convened Jan. 8.n

The 86th session of the Texas Legislature convened Jan. 8.n

Senate Bill 7, authored by state Sen. Brandon Creighton, R-Conroe, passed unanimously March 20, along with SB 6 and SB 8 as part of a multibillion dollar package, which heads to the Texas House for consideration next.

State Sen. Charles Perry, R-Lubbock, filed SB 8 to create a statewide flood mitigation plan dividing Texas into regions based on river basins, allowing regional officials and stakeholders to make decisions on projects to protect local residents and property from flooding.

State Sen. Lois Kolkhorst, R-Brenham, filed SB 6, intended to create a model guide for what officials should do in the immediate aftermath of flooding based on studies showing Hurricane Harvey disaster recovery, rescue and relief efforts.

SB 7 would create the Texas Infrastructure Resiliency Fund, the funding mechanism for SB 6 and SB 8, according to Creighton's floor remarks. He said this bill will bring Texas tax dollars back to the state, maximizing federal recovery funds.

"Harvey was a storm of biblical proportions is not an everyday, expected occurrence. We didn't budget last year expecting to experience the largest storm in U.S. history. However, we have budgeted conservatively over that past years," Creighton said in his remarks. "We have saved money in our Rainy Day Fund, and it is at a historic balance. The Rainy Day Fund was created precisely for events like this—one-time expenditures to recover and rebuild."

The fund will be administered by the Texas Water Development Board and is the state's Texas-sized response for recovery from Harvey and mitigation in the future, according to Creighton.

"[SB] 7 is the next step of stepping up and taking care of each other," Creighton said in his remarks. "The next storm is 'when,' not 'if,' so let's take bold action today to prepare Texas."
SHARE THIS STORY
By Jules Rogers

Originally from the Pacific Northwest, Jules Rogers has been covering community journalism and urban trade news since 2014. She moved to Houston in June 2018 to become an editor with Community Impact Newspaper after four years of reporting for various newspapers affiliated with the Portland Tribune in Oregon, including two years at the Portland Business Tribune. Before that, Jules spent time reporting for the Grants Pass Daily Courier in Southern Oregon. Her favorite beats to cover are business, economic development and urban planning.


MOST RECENT

Codeverse
New studio aims to bring the fun in coding for kids

A fully interactive coding studio is bringing its high-tech features to The Galleria in June.

A Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County study on eliminating ride fares left both METRO board members and officials seemingly unconvinced of the likelihood of implementing it in Harris County. (Kelly Schafler/Community Impact Newspaper)
METRO board of directors say free fare 'not feasible' for transit authority

A METRO study on eliminating ride fares left board members and officials unconvinced of the likelihood of implementing it in Harris County.

Houston City Council approves revisions to 2015 flood buyout processes

New guidelines adjust single-family and multifamily home buyout process for those affected by 2015 floods.

Breathing Center of Houston moves therapy rehab to new location

Breathing Center of Houston has moved one of its locations to 6108 S. Rice Ave., Houston, on Jan. 8 from its old location on Beechnut Street. The new center offers a more modern decor along with the same program offerings, including outpatient rehabilitation, which focuses on improving the quality of life for patients with lung disease or chronic lung issues. Patients interact one-on-one with medical therapists to learn breathing techniques and strength and endurance exercises. 713-660-0663. www.bchouston.com

Meyerland HEB
H-E-B announces Meyerland store opening date

H-E-B will open its new Meyerland Plaza location Jan. 29 at 4700 Beechnut St., Houston.

(Jen Para/Community Impact Newspaper)
Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo concert tickets go on sale Jan. 16

Lower-level seating options are already very limited.

Texas oil and gas industry could see a major slowdown in 2020

The oil and natural gas industry paid a record-setting $16.3 billion in taxes and royalties to local governments and the state in 2019, the Texas Oil and Gas Association announced Tuesday.

HGA driver Derek King picks up a patient from David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport in Spring before transporting her to the Texas Medical Center. (Courtesy Derek King)
Houston Ground Angels seeking volunteers to drive patients to Texas Medical Center

Houston Ground Angels is a nonprofit organization that provides transportation between local airports and the Texas Medical Center for patients with cancer and other life-threatening diseases and illnesses.

Chevron Houston Marathon
Chevron Marathon 2020 street closures, places to watch and cheer on

This year’s Chevron Houston Marathon will bring 27,000 estimated participants into the area on Jan. 19.

Image courtesy ABC 13
Bellaire PD: Suspect arrested in connection with shooting death at Bellaire High School

Via ABC13: A student shot at Bellaire High School has died, sources told ABC13 Tuesday. Officials say the suspect is still on the loose.

The Texas Department of Transportation has announced a major road closure on Loop 610. (Courtesy Fotolia)
TxDOT: Section of Loop 610 will shut down overnight Wednesday, Thursday

The Texas Department of Transportation will close a section of Loop 610 overnight this week as construction continues on the elevated bus lanes project.

GreenStreet is a 570,000 square foot mixed-use, walkable development located in downtown Houston along the METRORail, an area that would be subject to new development guidelines being considered by the city.
Public has final chance to weigh in on new policies aiming to make Houston more walkable

Proponents of two upcoming policy changes say they will make Houston pedestrian-friendly but opponents say they will cause more traffic and parking headaches.

Back to top