Texas Medical Center enters Phase 2 of capacity plan as COVID-19 ICU use continues to rise

Texas Medical Center entered Phase 2 surge levels as of July 1. (Courtesy Texas Medical Center)
Texas Medical Center entered Phase 2 surge levels as of July 1. (Courtesy Texas Medical Center)

Texas Medical Center entered Phase 2 surge levels as of July 1. (Courtesy Texas Medical Center)

With 1,350 total intensive care unit beds occupied and in use on June 30, Texas Medical Center officially surpassed its Phase 1 base capacity and has entered Phase 2 surge levels, according to the medical center's public reports July 1.

Phase 2 expands capacity by an additional 373 ICU beds, as well as more staff and equipment.

Of the ICU beds in use, 480 were occupied by COVID-19 patients, according to data reported by the medical center on July 1. The updated numbers come as Texas Medical Center hospitalized 326 new COVID-19 patients on June 30.

Across nine counties in Greater Houston, the hospital member systems of the medical center reported 1,747 COVID-19 patients on June 30, a 12% jump since June 28 and a 44% increase week over week.

As COVID-19 patient numbers continue to grow, the number of beds in use grows along with them, TMC data shows, which includes general use medical/surgical beds and ICU beds. In the past week, the medical center reported a 6.3% daily growth in occupancy of medical/surgical beds, and a 4% daily growth in occupancy of ICU beds.


The medical center projects that with such growth, TMC will likely not move into Phase 3 within at least two weeks.

Such a move would mean further planned utilization of Phase 2 levers of surge capacity to provide additional temporary ICU capacity, with 504 more beds.

“This can be managed by appropriately transferring patients from ICU to Medical/Surgical beds and potentially by delaying some procedures,” the TMC wrote on its dashboard slides about the data.
By Hunter Marrow
Hunter Marrow came to Community Impact Newspaper in January 2020. Before that, Hunter covered local news in Ontario, OR for three years, covering municipal issues, crime, and education across Malheur County and across the border into Idaho.