Eight redevelopment projects pitched for inclusion in upcoming Richardson bond

A repurposing of the Polk Street alley is proposed for inclusion in the bond. This conceptual rendering shows what that project could look like but is intended for discussion purposes only, Deputy City Manager Don Magner said. (Courtesy city of Richardson)
A repurposing of the Polk Street alley is proposed for inclusion in the bond. This conceptual rendering shows what that project could look like but is intended for discussion purposes only, Deputy City Manager Don Magner said. (Courtesy city of Richardson)

A repurposing of the Polk Street alley is proposed for inclusion in the bond. This conceptual rendering shows what that project could look like but is intended for discussion purposes only, Deputy City Manager Don Magner said. (Courtesy city of Richardson)

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Eight projects intended to enhance areas of Richardson targeted for redevelopment could be included in the city's upcoming municipal bond package.

Staff presented an overview of proposals at a March 15 City Council meeting. The projects would span the Core District and the Richardson Innovation Quarter and would be generally concentrated east of US 75 between Campbell and Spring Valley roads.

The projects that rose to the top of the list for potential bond inclusion were those that could build upon recent infrastructure improvements, could spur further investment and had the potential for matching funds from Dallas County, Deputy City Manager Don Magner said.

The total estimated costs for all eight projects is $29.1 million; however, previous voter-approved bond funds and contributions by Dallas County bring the total cost down to $19.6 million, Magner said.

The details and estimated costs for each project are below. Staff will refine the plans before returning in April for further guidance from council. A final bond proposition is expected to be confirmed in June. The election is tentatively scheduled for November.


Project 1: Intersection improvements at Belt Line/Main Street and US 75

This project would connect the historic downtown area east of US 75 with the Lockwood District and Richardson Heights Shopping Center on the west side of the highway via a wider sidewalk with enhanced lighting. It would also include a pedestrian greenway link that begins at Routh Young Park and ends in the Lockwood District.

The total cost for infrastructure is $3.2 million; however, Dallas County has agreed to kick in $1 million, which brings the bond cost to $2.2 million. An additional $2.8 million would be needed for amenities not included in the bond.

Project 2: Polk Street alley pedestrian improvements

The goal of this project is to enhance an underused alley by creating a pedestrian passageway between Main and Polk streets, Magner said. The alley, which already features a mural, courtesy of wedding collaborative The Darling Co., could incorporate more public art and could be used for additional outdoor seating for businesses.

The total cost for infrastructure is $2.2 million and does not include a local match. The remaining $2 million for amenities would not be included in the bond.

Project 3: McKinney Street reconstruction

McKinney Street reconstruction was included in the original pitch for the city’s $21 million Main Street infrastructure project but was left on the cutting room floor during council approval, Magner said. A recent street assessment gave the stretch a failing grade, he added.

The project would involve a curb-to-curb replacement of McKinney Street, including underground utilities.

The total project cost is $2.5 million; however, Dallas County has agreed to pitch $680,000, which brings the bond cost to $1.82 million, Magner said.

Project 4: Center turn lanes along Main Street

The project would provide center turn lanes along Main between Greenville Avenue and Abrams Road. This would improve the appearance and function of the roadway, Magner said.

The total cost for the project is $7 million, but Dallas County has agreed to contribute $2.96 million, which brings the bond cost down to roughly $4 million.

Project 5: Glenville Drive reconstruction

The project would rebuild Glenville from Campbell to Arapaho roads. It would replace a vehicle lane in each direction with a raised bicycle and tech lane intended for bots and other automated delivery services, Magner said.

The total cost of the project is $19.6 million; however, Dallas County has agreed to contribute $3 million, and the city also has $7.3 million in 2015 bond funds it can put toward the improvements, which brings the total bond cost down to about $9.5 million.

Project 6: Arapaho Road and US 75 intersection improvements

The project would provide a safer pedestrian and bicycle passageway underneath US 75 along Arapaho Road, Magner said. The total cost is $3.1 million; however, Dallas County has agreed to contribute $1 million, which brings the bond cost to $2.1 million.

Project 7: Collins Boulevard bridge portal and mobility improvements

This project would enhance the pedestrian and bicycle connection over US 75 by widening the sidewalk on the Collins Boulevard bridge. It would also add a bike lane in each direction.

The total infrastructure cost is $5.1 million; Dallas County has agreed to contribute $750,000, which brings the bond cost to $4.4 million. An additional $3.8 million in amenities would need to be covered through another source, Magner said.

Project 8: Duck Creek Trail enhancements

This project would build upon the city’s recently completed extension of Duck Creek Trail, Magner said. It would add lighting, benches and trash cans, and erosion control, among other infrastructure improvements. The city hopes the trail will become an open space amenity for businesses in the Innovation Quarter, Magner said.

The infrastructure improvements have an estimated cost of $3.6 million and do not include a local match, Magner said. An additional $6.2 million that is not included in the bond proposal would be needed for amenities, such as murals, shade structures and more.
By Olivia Lueckemeyer
Olivia Lueckemeyer graduated in 2013 from Loyola University New Orleans with a degree in journalism. She joined Community Impact Newspaper in October 2016 as reporter for the Southwest Austin edition before her promotion to editor in March 2017. In July 2018 she returned home to the Dallas area and became editor of the Richardson edition.


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