Developer pursues new Plano apartments with grassy setback from nearby neighborhood

A portion of Nueces Drive will be removed to make way for a greenbelt between the Promontory on Preston development's proposed apartment buildings (left) and the existing neighborhoods to the south. (Screenshot from city of Plano presentation)
A portion of Nueces Drive will be removed to make way for a greenbelt between the Promontory on Preston development's proposed apartment buildings (left) and the existing neighborhoods to the south. (Screenshot from city of Plano presentation)

A portion of Nueces Drive will be removed to make way for a greenbelt between the Promontory on Preston development's proposed apartment buildings (left) and the existing neighborhoods to the south. (Screenshot from city of Plano presentation)

A developer’s plan for new apartments approved this week would replace an existing paved road with a walkable greenbelt southeast of Preston Road and Spring Creek Parkway.

Plano City Council on July 27 approved the plans for the Promontory on Preston development, placing a limit of 264 apartment units on the project and requiring two-story apartment buildings be set back at least 75 feet from the homes to the south.

The apartments would be set off from nearby neighborhoods by a wide stretch of green space with walking paths. The green space would serve as a buffer between the proposed apartments and existing houses, replacing a stretch of Nueces Drive that runs north of the neighborhood.

Council members also signed off on an update to the city’s comprehensive plan, striking that portion of the street from the thoroughfare map.

The residential portion of the development would replace the existing Kohl’s building—the only developed structure on the property.


Developers told council members they hoped to retain Kohl’s elsewhere on the property. Plans for other retail stores have been reduced “consistent with market trends,” developers said in a presentation to council members.

Instead, developers said they said they are seeking a “small-box grocery store” for the nonresidential sections of the development as well as other food and beverage uses.

Council members approved the changes to development standards by a 7-1 vote. Council Member Lily Bao voted against the item. Shelby Williams, another council member, said he had reservations about some parts of the plan, but he voted for it because of the efforts the developers made to seek out ideas from nearby property owners.
By Daniel Houston
Daniel Houston covers city government, transportation, business and education for Community Impact Newspaper in Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village. A Fort Worth native and Baylor University graduate, Daniel reported previously for The Associated Press in Oklahoma City and The Dallas Morning News.


MOST RECENT

The Texas Central rail connection from Dallas to Houston will feature a bullet train similar to this one. (Courtesy Texas Central Partners/Community Impact Newspaper)
Texas Supreme Court declines to review high-speed rail case, freeing company up to use eminent domain

Texas Central, the company looking to build a 236-mile high-speed rail line connecting Houston and Dallas, has been given a big win in an ongoing legal battle over whether the company is legally recognized as a "railroad company" under state law.

The Mexican restaurant offers a variety of tortas, prepared with beans, tomato, avocado, onion and mayo, as well as antojitos, burritos and tacos. (Courtesy La Hechizera Tortas)
La Hechizera Tortas now open in Plano

The Mexican restaurant offers a variety of tortas, prepared with beans, tomato, avocado, onion and mayo, as well as antojitos, burritos and tacos.

The Mediterranean fast-food concept offers signature shawarma rolls and rice bowls in varying degrees of spice levels. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Chop House Gyro opens Plano location

The Mediterranean fast-food restaurant offers signature shawarma rolls and rice bowls in varying degrees of spice levels.

Major overhaul of DART bus system includes expanded service in Plano

Dallas Area Rapid Transit is planning its first major bus network redesign to address the significant growth Plano and the surrounding areas have seen since the service was created in 1983.

Gals on and off the Green carries sizes 00 to 22. (Karen Chaney/Community Impact Newspaper)
Plano boutique Gals on and off the Green specializes in fashionable golf clothing for women

Jackie Sorrenti opened Gals on and off the Green in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 2004. She opened her second location in Plano in 2014.

The restaurant offers a full Tex-Mex style menu and is known for its Bob Armstrong dip and chile relleno. (Courtesy Matt's Rancho Martinez)
Matt's Rancho Martinez coming soon to Plano

The restaurant offers a full Tex-Mex style menu and is known for its Bob Armstrong dip and chile relleno.

Mesero has six locations across the metroplex, with a seventh on the way in Southlake. (Courtesy Mesero)
Tex-Mex restaurant may come to Southlake; African fusion eatery opens in Frisco and more DFW-area news

Read the latest business and community news from the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Pho (small $9.50, large $10.50) is a traditional Vietnamese rice noodle soup. (Stephen Hunt/Community Impact Newspaper)
Plano restaurant Pho Mac serves authentic Vietnamese food in a family setting

The menu features staples from the Southeast Asian nation, such as banh mi, egg and spring rolls, and specialty noodle soups.

Texas Central has signed a $16 billion contract with Webuild to lead the civil construction team that will build the train. (Rendering courtesy Texas Central)
Texas Central signs $16B construction contract for high-speed rail project

Texas Central could be one step closer to starting construction.

council in chambers
Julie Holmer, Kayci Prince sworn in on Plano City Council

Runoff election winners Julie Holmer and Kayci Prince were sworn in at the June 14 Plano City Council meeting.