Q&A: Medrick Yhap is running for U.S. representative, Texas District 3

This election cycle has an unusually high number of prominent open races, with eight Texans in the U.S. House opting not to run for re-election and more than a dozen in the Texas Legislature doing the same.

This election cycle has an unusually high number of prominent open races, with eight Texans in the U.S. House opting not to run for re-election and more than a dozen in the Texas Legislature doing the same.

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Medrick Yhap
Medrick Yhap has filed to run for U.S. representative, District 3. He is running as a Democrat against Adam P. Bell, Lorie Burch and Sam Johnson in the March 6 primary election.

Community Impact Newspaper sent Yhap a list of questions about his candidacy. Below are his answers, edited for publication style.

Q: Why did you decide to run for this office?

A: Our voices have become diminished and we, the people, are ignored. It is time for “we the people” to be represented again. I will uphold integrity in the office, represent the families and communities of the district and focus on issues that are relevant to my constituency. I will ensure that our voices are heard loud and clear. Together we will work towards solutions to benefit all people. I will uphold integrity in the office, represent the families and communities of the district and focus on issues that are relevant to my constituency. I will ensure that our voices are heard loud and clear.

Q: What experience—professionally or politically—do you have that would prepare you for this position? 

A: My years of experience have prepared me for this position. I began my career serving as a police officer with the city of Dallas where I developed extensive skills working with the public, de-escalating situations and finding ways to bring about positive solutions for all involved. During this time, I have had the opportunity to go into the public schools and teach drug prevention to students in addition to normal duties of an officer. I served as a volunteer soccer coach for my children’s elementary and middle schools.  I then carried these skills into the private industry, working with complex issues and bringing them to a resolution. I currently serve as a precinct chair for Wylie. I believe that my experience in conflict resolution, as well as my education background makes me a great candidate.

Q: If elected, what would be your top priorities?

A: 

  • Health care—It should go without saying that a strong society requires well educated, healthy citizens and to take health care off the table will do more harm than good. Recently, there was a report of a young North Texas school teacher dying from the flu because she could not afford a $116 copay for the vaccine. There are many Americans in this same boat, where they are not able to either go to the doctor or afford the medications prescribed. I support a robust and affordable universal health care system to ensure that Americans are healthy, in order to pursue life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

  • Education—Our education system should be globally competitive and our students need to keep up with the technology advancements for us to remain competitive in the global marketplace. We must work to ensure that our students are provided a safe environment to foster learning and to excel. Higher education is, for many, out of reach and the cost of higher education has created a silent debt crisis. Student loan payments are the second highest expense for college graduates after rent or mortgage, and the problem continues unabated. I will work to make community colleges free to attend, and fund universities and colleges so that it becomes affordable for all who wish to attend.

  • Cybersecurity—Most Americans essentially live in cyberspace. We work, shop, bank and socialize within these platforms. Cyberspace must be given the same level (or higher) of scrutiny and security than the physical offerings. This is a matter of national security. Countries as small as North Korea have the power to attack our electrical and water grids using malware and viruses. Both Republican and Democratic parties were hacked, but only one party's data was released. We cannot afford leakage of classified information. Accommodations must be made to resolve issues in real time because of the dynamic nature of the internet. We must protect citizens and government.


Q: What else do you want constituents to know about you and your background? 

A: For far too long we have suffered from inadequate representation. I say, enough. We deserve proper consideration. Our concerns must be addressed.

We demand to live in a fair and just society. It is essential we push forward instead of deteriorating. Fair wages, affordable education, access to healthcare, racial and gender equality, reasonable immigration policies, protections in the workplace and safe communities are paramount to our national security. Without such, we are divided.

Our country is an economic powerhouse with vast interests worldwide. We cannot afford to isolate ourselves. We must remain engaged to continue in our leadership role, enhance our standing and to bring meaningful change. It is crucial to open new markets for our goods, products and services for America to thrive.

As your representative and public servant, I will listen to and represent you and bring solutions. America must be united.


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