McKinney launches new program to forgive warrants, replaces annual warrant roundup

McKinney Municipal Court is now offering a new warrant forgiveness program. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
McKinney Municipal Court is now offering a new warrant forgiveness program. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

McKinney Municipal Court is now offering a new warrant forgiveness program. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

McKinney residents with outstanding warrants can get a fresh start with the city’s new warrant forgiveness program.

Under the new program, the McKinney Municipal Court will remove the resident’s warrant and $50 fee for each outstanding case that is resolved. A payment plan can be arranged to settle the debt, and those who take action may be eligible for payment alternatives, such as community service, according to a city news release. People who come forward will not be arrested.

“Driving around with a warrant is stressful and it’s already been a stressful 12 months,” McKinney Municipal Court Presiding Judge Claire Petty said in a statement. “We decided holding a warrant forgiveness program would help people out and assist us to clear the backlog.”

In previous years, the city would take part in the state’s annual Great Texas Warrant Roundup program in the month of February, through which it would collect the debts owed on outstanding warrants. Once the roundup period starts, residents with these warrants could be arrested at any time or place.

“We wanted to get away from that this year,” Petty said in her statement.


The program is underway now and will run through May 21 in McKinney, Petty said. She cautioned residents against scammers who make illegitimate calls to residents about false outstanding warrants and said to be suspicious of callers who say that they only take money orders or prepaid credit cards, since the McKinney Municipal Court does accept payment by credit card.

“You may ask for a copy of your citation if you suspect the call is not legitimate and we will be happy to provide it to you,” she said in her statement.

For more information, visit www.mckinneytexas.org/162/municipal-court.
By Miranda Jaimes

Editor, Frisco & McKinney

Miranda joined Community Impact Newspaper as an editor in August 2017 with the Grapevine/Colleyville/Southlake edition. In 2019 she transitioned to editor for the McKinney edition. She began covering Frisco as well in 2020. Miranda covers local government, transportation, business and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Miranda served as managing editor for The Prosper Press, The Anna-Melissa Tribune and The Van Alstyne Leader, and before that reported and did design for The Herald Democrat, a daily newspaper in Grayson County. She graduated with a degree in journalism from Oklahoma Christian University in 2014.