McKinney makes 'parklets' permanent for downtown outdoor dining

Outdoor dining areas called parklets are now a permanent fixture in downtown McKinney. (Miranda Jaimes/Community Impact Newspaper)
Outdoor dining areas called parklets are now a permanent fixture in downtown McKinney. (Miranda Jaimes/Community Impact Newspaper)

Outdoor dining areas called parklets are now a permanent fixture in downtown McKinney. (Miranda Jaimes/Community Impact Newspaper)

Two structures added to McKinney’s downtown area in 2020—comprised of fenced dining areas with seats, tables and umbrellas—are set to stay.

These structures, called parklets, were created to help create additional outdoor seating areas for restaurants that may have been struggling from the COVID-19 pandemic, city staff said at the time. The parklet program was established on a temporary basis as the city launched this experiment but was created with the provision that it could be extended or made permanent. On Dec. 7, McKinney City Council agreed to make the parklets permanent.


“I think it’s been a nice addition to the vibrancy of downtown,” Mayor George Fuller said about the parklets during the meeting.

There are two parklets downtown: one in front of CT Provisions Cocktail Parlor & Kitchen on West Louisiana Street, and the other in front of Huge Cafe on East Virginia Street. If the council had chosen not to take action, the parklet program was set to expire in December, staff said.

The parklets are owned by McKinney Main Street and will be able to be rented by individuals. The parklets will be managed by the Main Street board, and permits and agreements will be managed by the planning office, staff said. With the modified ordinance, the city will set an application fee and establish an annual rental fee for the cost of the parking spaces.
By Miranda Jaimes

Editor, Frisco & McKinney

Miranda joined Community Impact Newspaper as an editor in August 2017 with the Grapevine/Colleyville/Southlake edition. In 2019 she transitioned to editor for the McKinney edition. She began covering Frisco as well in 2020. Miranda covers local government, transportation, business and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Miranda served as managing editor for The Prosper Press, The Anna-Melissa Tribune and The Van Alstyne Leader, and before that reported and did design for The Herald Democrat, a daily newspaper in Grayson County. She graduated with a degree in journalism from Oklahoma Christian University in 2014.