Denton County commissioners approve adjusted county election precincts

man speaking at podium
Denton County Elections Administrator Frank Phillips discusses required county election precinct changes based on the 2020 census during a Nov. 30 Denton County Commissioners meeting. (Screenshot courtesy Denton County)

Denton County Elections Administrator Frank Phillips discusses required county election precinct changes based on the 2020 census during a Nov. 30 Denton County Commissioners meeting. (Screenshot courtesy Denton County)

Denton County commissioners approved adjustments to county election precincts following the 2020 census redistricting done by the state and the county.

The changes, which were approved unanimously during the Nov. 30 meeting, include 51 new election precincts. The new precincts bring the county total to 236, Denton County Elections Administrator Frank Phillips said.

The changes will take effect Jan. 1, according to a memo from Phillips.

Both the Denton County Democratic Party and the Denton County Republican Party were consulted for their input on boundary changes, Phillips said.

Changes were made to precincts that had more than 5,000 active voters located within the boundaries, which is dictated by Texas Election Code, Phillips said. Eight precincts had an excess of 5,000 active voters, including two precincts in Frisco.


Additional changes were required by the state's redistricting plan, which split 43 precincts, did cleanup around municipal districts and addressed other necessities, according to the memo.

The increased number of election precincts will mean an increase in the number of polling sites and poll workers for elections.

Commissioner precinct lines and justice of the peace and constable precinct lines were changed during a commissioners meeting Nov. 9, also as a result of the 2020 census.

Click here to see the new election precinct map for Denton County.
By Samantha Douty
Samantha Douty joined Community Impact Newspaper in 2021 as the Lewisville/ Flower Mound/ Highland Village editor. She graduated from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2018 with a degree in journalism. But her passion for journalism started when she was 16 years old. Before joining Community Impact Newspaper, she reported on education for the Victoria Advocate, a rural South Texas daily newspaper.