Grand opening of Lewisville’s new multigenerational center Thrive delayed until fall due to COVID-19 outbreak

Thrive will feature a natatorium, gymnasiums, an indoor walking track, a fitness area, community rooms, an indoor playground and more than 14,000 square feet of space for senior activities. (Rendering courtesy city of Lewisville)
Thrive will feature a natatorium, gymnasiums, an indoor walking track, a fitness area, community rooms, an indoor playground and more than 14,000 square feet of space for senior activities. (Rendering courtesy city of Lewisville)

Thrive will feature a natatorium, gymnasiums, an indoor walking track, a fitness area, community rooms, an indoor playground and more than 14,000 square feet of space for senior activities. (Rendering courtesy city of Lewisville)

The grand opening of the city of Lewisville’s 87,000-square-foot multigenerational center, Thrive, has been rescheduled from May 30 to early October due to the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak, according to city officials.

The facility, located at 1950 S. Valley Parkway, Lewisville, will feature a natatorium, gymnasiums, an indoor walking track, a fitness area, community rooms, an indoor playground and more than 14,000 square feet of space for senior activities.

Though city officials say construction on Thrive is “largely on schedule," there have been minor delays due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Construction is expected to be completed in May.

“We know there is tremendous excitement in the community about Thrive, and we want to open as soon as we can,” Mayor Rudy Durham said in an April 14 statement. “Our top priority has to be the safety and well-being of our residents, visitors, and staff during this unprecedented time. That, combined with serious financial challenges that still are not fully known, will delay us but won’t stop us from giving residents the multigenerational recreation center that they want and deserve.”

Officials are reviewing the city’s budget, but the city is experiencing large declines in retail sales tax, hotel occupancy tax and other revenue sources as residents follow the stay-at-home orders mandated by state and local governments, according to an April 14 news release from the city. While the construction of Thrive is funded by a bond approved by voters in November 2015, the center’s operations are set to be funded by a combination of user fees and tax revenue.


Herring Recreation Center will remain closed indefinitely so that its operating budget can be reallocated to support Thrive when it opens, according to the release. Herring Recreation Center was already set to close temporarily for remodeling after Thrive opened.

Residents with paid memberships to Herring Recreation Center can request a prorated refund or upgrade to a Thrive membership, according to the city.