FIRST LOOK: Flower Mound family opens community-focused meat market

Katie and Clayton Flurry opened Flurry's Market + Provisions in December. (Photos by Samantha Douty/ Community Impact Newspaper)
Katie and Clayton Flurry opened Flurry's Market + Provisions in December. (Photos by Samantha Douty/ Community Impact Newspaper)

Katie and Clayton Flurry opened Flurry's Market + Provisions in December. (Photos by Samantha Douty/ Community Impact Newspaper)

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Flurry’s Market + Provisions has professional meat cutters and fish mongers on site.
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The meat market has a number of beef, pork, chicken and other cuts of meat. (Samantha Douty/ Community Impact Newspaper)
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Seafood such as salmon, trout, oysters and shrimp are a staple at Flurry's Market + Provisions. Prices fluctuate with market value. (Samantha Douty/ Community Impact Newspaper)
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Speciality items like beef pinwheels are offered at the local meat market. (Samantha Douty/ Community Impact Newspaper)
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Along side the meat market, Flurry's offers cooked meals at its bistro. Customers can order a range of food such as soups, salads, burgers, po' boys and other Louisiana staples. (Samantha Douty/ Community Impact Newspaper)
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Oysters are available for purchase.
Clayton and Katie Flurry tell people Flurry’s Market + Provisions came about with the dual traits of a dreamer and a doer.

“[Clayton] has this dream of wanting to go, just get out and do something more service based [and] community based,” Katie said about her husband of 17 years. “But the problem with that is that he’s a doer, and he will make it happen.”

Before the couple opened Flurry’s, Clayton worked in a corporate energy job, and Katie raised the couple’s three children. During the pandemic, work became cyclical, and Clayton decided he wanted to open a meat market, he said.

The beginning ideas of Flurry’s started on a napkin at Hillside Fine Grill, and it grew to a Flower Mound brick-and-mortar storefront that opened in December.

The Flurrys wanted to offer quality food and meat to the members of their community, Clayton said. That sentiment is the base of their mission statement, “To provide excellence and quality to every customer every time.”


The couple also wanted to fill a void they believed was missing in their community for a meat market.

While opening the business, the couple surrounded themselves with mentors and other business owners, Clayton said. Even now, they have experts, including meat cutters and fish mongers, working behind the counter.Clayton and Katie were born and raised in Louisiana and have a passion for quality food. They show that through their meat market as well as the in-store bistro. There, customers can get meals that incorporate a Louisiana and Texas blend of flavors. Flurry’s Market + Provisions also offers a gift shop with seasonal and year-round options.

“The community’s response has been fabulous,” Clayton said. “I didn’t know what to expect. I expected that there’d be interest but not the interest level we’ve had.”The goal is to know their customers when they walk in the door, Katie said. Those repeat customers are called “Friends of Flurry’s.”

“We want to know people’s names,” Katie said. “We want to recognize them when they come in.”

The Flurrys said they wanted to build a community through their business. They also wanted their business to be an extension of their home, where people feel welcomed, Katie said.

“This is something that Katie and I poured our hearts into,” Clayton said. “The future potential is extremely bright.”

Flurry’s Market + Provisions

2608 Long Prairie Road, Flower Mound

469-498-3689 | www.flurrysmarket.com/home

Market hours: Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-7 p.m.

Bistro hours: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and 4-7 p.m.
By Samantha Douty
Samantha Douty joined Community Impact Newspaper in 2021 as the Lewisville/ Flower Mound/ Highland Village editor. She graduated from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2018 with a degree in journalism. But her passion for journalism started when she was 16 years old. Before joining Community Impact Newspaper, she reported on education for the Victoria Advocate, a rural South Texas daily newspaper.