Split in 2, Highland Village seeks single state House district for its residents

Highland Village on Feb. 9 approved its legislative priorities for the 87th legislative session. (Ally Crutcher/Community Impact Newspaper)
Highland Village on Feb. 9 approved its legislative priorities for the 87th legislative session. (Ally Crutcher/Community Impact Newspaper)

Highland Village on Feb. 9 approved its legislative priorities for the 87th legislative session. (Ally Crutcher/Community Impact Newspaper)

The city of Highland Village is asking state lawmakers to allow its residents to be represented by a single district in the Texas House of Representatives.

This request is part of a detailed list of the city’s priorities for the coming 87th legislative session. Highland Village City Council approved these priorities at its Feb. 9 meeting.

“Our community is only 5.5 square miles with a population of 15,820 people, yet is represented by two House Districts,” the city’s legislative program reads. “Highland Village is a very homogeneous city and would be better served by having one State Representative.”

Highland Village residents are currently split between two districts in the House: District 63, represented by Republican Tan Parker; and District 65, represented by Democrat Michelle Beckley.

Beckley’s district includes the eastern portion of Highland Village, most of Lewisville and parts of Castle Hills and Carrollton. Parker’s district consists of the western part of Highland Village, Flower Mound and a number of other cities, towns and unincorporated areas in southwest Denton County.


This request and others in the city’s legislative program would not become law unless the Texas Legislature were to pass proposals supporting them. The Highland Village document is a statement of what the city would support in the ongoing session.

The document also included a number of other legislative priorities centered around the principle of local control.

“The main theme throughout is cities are the level of government that is closest to the people it serves, and therefore are the level of government best able to identify the needs of a community and appropriate means to address those needs,” the city said in a Feb. 10 news release.

Read the city's full list of legislative priorities in the document below.

By Daniel Houston
Daniel Houston covers city government, transportation, business and education for Community Impact Newspaper in Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village. A Fort Worth native and Baylor University graduate, Daniel reported previously for The Associated Press in Oklahoma City and The Dallas Morning News.


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