City of Fort Worth Complete Streets policy aims to prevent pedestrian deaths

Complete Streets are areas with transportation infrastructure and public access ways that are designed to enable safe, accessible, comfortable and convenient access for all people and travel modes. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)
Complete Streets are areas with transportation infrastructure and public access ways that are designed to enable safe, accessible, comfortable and convenient access for all people and travel modes. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)

Complete Streets are areas with transportation infrastructure and public access ways that are designed to enable safe, accessible, comfortable and convenient access for all people and travel modes. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)

The city of Fort Worth has committed to a number of Complete Streets projects throughout the city in order to create a more comfortable pedestrian environment.

The city defines Complete Streets as those areas with transportation infrastructure and public access ways that are designed to enable safe, accessible, comfortable and convenient access for all people and travel modes. The city first adopted a Complete Streets policy in 2016.

“Adopting a Compete Streets policy was an important step in improving equity, safety and public health, but now the real work is occurring,” District 9 Council Member Ann Zadeh said in a city news release. “As we move forward, it is actually the implementation and delivery of the physical design that delivers streets with sidewalks, bike lanes, accommodation for transit and the stops that service transit, frequent and safe crossing opportunities—to name just a few—that improve the quality of life for all.”

A recent report by CityHealth looked at the nation’s 40 largest cities and awarded Fort Worth and 28 additional cities gold status based on Complete Streets policies.

According to the National Safety Council, there has been a 35% increase in pedestrian deaths nationwide since 2009, and pedestrian deaths have increased from 12% to 16% of all traffic-related fatalities.


“Designing projects from the beginning to accommodate everyone safely is vital because retrofitting existing infrastructure hasn’t always worked, and other areas are simply lacking in the basic requirements to safely share the road,” the release said. “Under the [Complete Streets] policy, transportation projects that require city approval are directed to consistently plan, design, construct and maintain streets to allow for safe and comfortable travel by all people, regardless of transportation choice, age or ability.”

The city of Fort Worth recorded a 10-year high in 2018, with 38 pedestrian deaths; however, the city had 23 pedestrian fatalities and 136 injuries in 2019, which represents the fewest number of fatalities and injuries since 2014.

For more information on the Complete Streets program, click here.