City of Fort Worth Complete Streets policy aims to prevent pedestrian deaths

Complete Streets are areas with transportation infrastructure and public access ways that are designed to enable safe, accessible, comfortable and convenient access for all people and travel modes. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)
Complete Streets are areas with transportation infrastructure and public access ways that are designed to enable safe, accessible, comfortable and convenient access for all people and travel modes. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)

Complete Streets are areas with transportation infrastructure and public access ways that are designed to enable safe, accessible, comfortable and convenient access for all people and travel modes. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)

The city of Fort Worth has committed to a number of Complete Streets projects throughout the city in order to create a more comfortable pedestrian environment.

The city defines Complete Streets as those areas with transportation infrastructure and public access ways that are designed to enable safe, accessible, comfortable and convenient access for all people and travel modes. The city first adopted a Complete Streets policy in 2016.

“Adopting a Compete Streets policy was an important step in improving equity, safety and public health, but now the real work is occurring,” District 9 Council Member Ann Zadeh said in a city news release. “As we move forward, it is actually the implementation and delivery of the physical design that delivers streets with sidewalks, bike lanes, accommodation for transit and the stops that service transit, frequent and safe crossing opportunities—to name just a few—that improve the quality of life for all.”

A recent report by CityHealth looked at the nation’s 40 largest cities and awarded Fort Worth and 28 additional cities gold status based on Complete Streets policies.

According to the National Safety Council, there has been a 35% increase in pedestrian deaths nationwide since 2009, and pedestrian deaths have increased from 12% to 16% of all traffic-related fatalities.


“Designing projects from the beginning to accommodate everyone safely is vital because retrofitting existing infrastructure hasn’t always worked, and other areas are simply lacking in the basic requirements to safely share the road,” the release said. “Under the [Complete Streets] policy, transportation projects that require city approval are directed to consistently plan, design, construct and maintain streets to allow for safe and comfortable travel by all people, regardless of transportation choice, age or ability.”

The city of Fort Worth recorded a 10-year high in 2018, with 38 pedestrian deaths; however, the city had 23 pedestrian fatalities and 136 injuries in 2019, which represents the fewest number of fatalities and injuries since 2014.

For more information on the Complete Streets program, click here.

By Ian Pribanic
Ian Pribanic covers city government, transportation, business and education news for Community Impact Newspaper in the Keller-Roanoke-Northeast Fort Worth areas. A Washington D.C. native and University of North Texas graduate, Ian was previously an editor for papers in Oklahoma, West Texas and for Community Impact in New Braunfels.


MOST RECENT

Walk-On's is opening in McKinney in 2022. (Courtesy Walk-Ons Sports Bistreaux & Bar)
Co-owner Dak Prescott to launch eatery in McKinney; Goody Goody Liquor coming to Keller and more DFW-area news

Read the latest business and community news from the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Inside play areas at Cheeky Monkeys
Kids' play space Cheeky Monkeys now open in Fort Worth

The indoor playground also serves as a party venue.

The Metroport Chamber of Commerce lobby allows members to post their business cards on the wall to share. (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper)
Metroport Chamber of Commerce unveils new office space in Roanoke

The Metroport Chamber of Commerce has relocated to 381 W. Byron Nelson Blvd., Roanoke, with an 8,000-square-foot office space.

A person picking up a slice of pizza
Alex's Pizza and Pasta now open in Fort Worth

The restaurant serves a variety of pizzas, entrees, desserts and more.

Elevations showing the front of the proposed Goody Goody store
Goody Goody Liquor will soon be Keller's second liquor store

City Council approved a specific use permit for the business May 4.

Crumbl Cookies offers over 120 rotating cookie flavors. (Courtesy Crumbl Cookies)
Crumbl Cookies to open in Plano; McKinney trash pickup rates to rise and more DFW-area news

Read the latest business and community news form the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Keller Town Hall
Keller City Council approves Matrix Consulting Group for fire department merger study

The feasibility study is part of a 16-month trial period for Keller and Westlake.

A report looks at the economic impact of voter access in Texas. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Proposed Texas election laws could hurt Tarrant County

The report by Ray Perryman's firm said that highly educated and highly skilled workers typically don’t choose to live in areas where voter access is limited.

A sauna filled with red light
Infrared Mind and Body now open in Fort Worth

The spa combines infrared technology with traditional sauna treatments.

asphalt work on road
Committee to start ranking proposed transportation projects in Tarrant County

Tarrant County commissioners approved a contract to hire a consultant to help prioritize transportation projects.

As of April 28, Tarrant County has administered more than 1.13 million vaccine doses since Dec. 14, 2020. (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper)
Pop-up clinics, added language options to bolster vaccine outreach in Tarrant County

The University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth will soon offer pop-up COVID-19 vaccine clinics to help Tarrant County officials target communities with the largest percentages of eligible but unvaccinated people.