Voters strike down Fort Worth charter amendment to increase pay for mayor, council members

Proposition F on the ballot proposed an increase in pay for the mayor and council members. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Proposition F on the ballot proposed an increase in pay for the mayor and council members. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Proposition F on the ballot proposed an increase in pay for the mayor and council members. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Updated May 8 at 1:20 p.m. This post has been updated to reflect the latest information.

Voters in Tarrant, Denton and Parker counties denied a pay raise for the Fort Worth mayor and City Council based on unofficial results from the May 7 election.

The May 7 ballot included 13 proposed charter amendments. The majority of them would delete outdated language and change wording in the charter, according to the city.

Proposition F on the ballot proposed an increase in pay for the mayor and council. The annual salaries were last updated in 2006, with the mayor receiving $29,000 and the council receiving $25,000.

A total of 15,035 votes, or 52.27%, were cast against Proposition F, according to unofficial results. A total of 13,727 votes were cast for it.


If approved, the mayor’s pay would have been increased to about $99,653 annually, a news release from Mayor Mattie Parker stated. Council members would have been paid about $76,727 annually.

Ten out of the 13 charter amendments were approved by Fort Worth voters. In a May 7 Twitter thread, Parker expressed her gratitude.

“I also appreciate that voters provided us valuable feedback on City Charter changes, which included passing many important technical amendments to address the ever-evolving needs of a big city,” she stated.
By Matt Payne
Matt Payne reports on Frisco City Hall and its committees, Collin County Commissioners and McKinney business. His experience includes serving as online content editor at Fort Worth Magazine and city editor at the Killeen Daily Herald. He is a 2017 graduate of the Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism at the University of North Texas in Denton.