Fort Worth to hold series of public meetings on May 7 election propositions

Voting booth
Fort Worth will hold a series of public meetings where residents can learn more about the bond propositions and charter amendments listed on the city's May 7 election ballot. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Fort Worth will hold a series of public meetings where residents can learn more about the bond propositions and charter amendments listed on the city's May 7 election ballot. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Fort Worth will be holding a series of public meetings where residents can learn more about the five bond propositions and 13 charter amendments on the city's May 7 election ballot.

According to the city's website, the public meetings will be held at various locations throughout the city in March and April. All weekday meetings will be from 6-8 p.m., and the Saturday meeting will be from 10 a.m.-noon. Residents can also submit questions and comments via email.

Public meeting schedule:

March 21: All City Council districts

City Hall Council Chamber and virtual


March 23: District 4

Riverside Community Center, 3700 E. Belknap St.

March 24: District 6

Chisholm Trail Community Center, 4936 McPherson Blvd.

March 28: Districts 4 and 7

Golden Triangle Library, 4264 Golden Triangle Blvd.

March 31: District 3

Como Community Center, 4660 Horne St.

April 4: District 9

Worth Heights Community Center, 3551 New York Ave.

April 7: Districts 2 and 7

Northwest Library, 6228 Crystal Lake Drive

April 11: District 4

East Regional Library, 6301 Bridge St.

April 20: District 8

McDonald YMCA, 2701 Moresby St.

April 23: District 5

Handley Meadowbrook Community Center, 6201 Beaty St.

April 25: District 2

Rockwood Park Golf Clubhouse, 1851 Jacksboro Hwy.

Bond election

The proposed 2022 bond program is broken down into five positions. Residents can vote for or against each proposition on the ballot.

The $560 million bond package includes propositions to fund capital projects in Fort Worth neighborhoods and business districts. If the bond propositions pass, there will be no direct change to the property tax rate, and the city’s tax rate should not need to increase to repay the bonds, according to a city newsletter.

Proposition A: $360.2 million for streets and mobility-related projects

Proposition B: $124 million for park and recreation projects, including a new aquatics center in the Stop Six neighborhood and a rebuilt Forest Park Pool

Proposition C: $12.5 million for a new library in far northwest Fort Worth

Proposition D: $39.3 million for police and fire public safety facilities; included is a proposed headquarters for the Northwest Patrol Division

Proposition E: $15 million for the city’s Open Space program, which focuses on acquiring natural areas

Charter election

Thirteen proposed amendments to the Fort Worth City Charter will be on the May 7 ballot. Voters may vote for or against each of the propositions individually.

Among the propositions is increasing the annual pay for the mayor and council members as well as other propositions designed to delete outdated language and to reflect the current organization of Fort Worth’s municipal government.

District 4 special election

An election will also be held on May 7 to fill an unexpired term in Council District 4 after Council Member Cary Moon filed to run for the Texas House of Representatives. Four candidates filed to run for the open position: Alan Blaylock, James H. McBride, Teresa Ramirez and Tara Wilson.
By Ben Karkela
Ben Karkela joined Community Impact Newspaper in 2022 as editor of the Grapevine-Colleyville-Southlake and Keller-Roanoke-Northeast Fort Worth publications. He graduated from Minnesota State University Moorhead in 2011 and previously worked for The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead, The Bemidji Pioneer and The Grand Rapids Herald-Review.