Performing arts nonprofit reopens studio in Fort Worth

During Stand Performing Arts summer camps, students learn choreography and other aspects of a production in order to perform a show for a full audience. (Courtesy Stand Performing Arts Ministries)
During Stand Performing Arts summer camps, students learn choreography and other aspects of a production in order to perform a show for a full audience. (Courtesy Stand Performing Arts Ministries)

During Stand Performing Arts summer camps, students learn choreography and other aspects of a production in order to perform a show for a full audience. (Courtesy Stand Performing Arts Ministries)

Like many other businesses, Stand Performing Arts Ministries has been affected by COVID-19 restrictions, but it is now reopening its Fort Worth studio for summer classes.

The local nonprofit offers performing arts lessons and productions, including showcases and classes for singing, dancing, acting and more. During Stand summer camps, students learn choreography and other aspects of a production in order to perform a show for a full audience.

“We just opened back up our studio after all of the COVID-19 [restrictions],” said Jessie Beebe, founder of Stand Performing Arts Ministries.

Kids are being separated during classes to ensure social distancing of six feet or more, she said. During the spring semester, students were also provided Facebook Live and Zoom options for classes and performances.

"We were supposed to do an entire production, but we couldn't," Beebe said. "We ended up going live on Facebook, and it worked out."


Founded in 2005, Stand Ministries provides an avenue to train and create discipline for kids and teens through dance, song and acting, Beebe said.

Summer camps in 2020 will feature a number of productions for children and teens, such as “Totally Trolls” and “Fabulously Frozen.” Stand productions support a wide range of children and teens from ages four to 19.

“We just published a children’s book [based] on a play I wrote,” Beebe said.

The production “No Place Like Home” uses inspiration from the classic "The Wizard of Oz" and features characters the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, the Cowardly Lion and the Munchkins.

A copy of “No Place Like Home: A Fantastical Journey to the Kingdom of Heaven,” by Beebe and Janet Adele Bloss, is available on Amazon.

Stand Performing Arts summer camps start at $200 per participant along with a $50 registration fee.

“Stand exists to empower the next generation to take a stand and be all they are created to be using the performing arts,” according to the nonprofit’s mission statement. “Students'gifts and talents are developed through leadership classes and then used to reach the multitudes by performing at festivals, churches and schools."

By Ian Pribanic
Ian Pribanic covers city government, transportation, business and education news for Community Impact Newspaper in the Keller-Roanoke-Northeast Fort Worth areas. A Washington D.C. native and University of North Texas graduate, Ian was previously an editor for papers in Oklahoma, West Texas and for Community Impact in New Braunfels.


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