WeScanFiles: Fort Worth-based digital document specialist flourishes in era of social distancing

WeScanFiles caters to a number of corporations, government entities and private clients. (Katherine Borey/Community Impact Newspaper)
WeScanFiles caters to a number of corporations, government entities and private clients. (Katherine Borey/Community Impact Newspaper)

WeScanFiles caters to a number of corporations, government entities and private clients. (Katherine Borey/Community Impact Newspaper)

The goal at WeScanFiles is to be good at a lot of things, not just one, owner Blake Crenshaw said; his business is a shotgun, not a laser.

“It is important to be innovative, to be flexible and be nimble,” he said. “Otherwise, you are going to paint yourself in a corner.”

With business-type documents as its “bread and butter,” Crenshaw said, WeScanFiles caters to a number of corporations and government entities.

“I am their digital librarian,” Crenshaw said. “I am finding ways to serve my clients better, both in search capability and data storage.”

Recognizing the “new normal” of today, the business has also grown to accommodate virtually all types of “heirloom” scanning, he said. With old slides, CDs posters, photo albums, diaries, scrapbooks and more, Crenshaw has the ability to provide digital, high-resolution versions of old media.


“People are at home cleaning out their closets, and they are finding grandma’s shoebox,” he said. “They are getting in touch with history and memories, and it is really fun when folks come to pick up projects and re-meet their grandparents [or relatives] in a way they never knew them.”

Crenshaw has streamlined the digital document process, he said, which allows him to catalog, organize and digitize older storage devices.

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, he has also begun offering safe drop-offs and pickups from a business or a home.

“There is still an opportunity for collaboration,” Crenshaw said.

Being able to evolve and innovate has been the biggest key to success, he said.

“Oftentimes, the client does throw a curveball where I have to learn something different," Crenshaw said.

More recently, Crenshaw has added sound and picture editing and document restoration to his repertoire.

“If all I was doing was digitizing documents, we would struggle,” Crenshaw said, emphasizing the sentimental value inherent in his business. “I have received things from the 1700s and have had folks in their 50s and 60s who were getting a chance to see something they had not seen in 40 years.”