Frisco City Council approves slight name changes for seven downtown streets

The corner of 1st Street and Cherry Street in downtown Frisco is one of three street signs that will be replaced following City Council's approval of the use of a numeral abbreviation for 1st Street. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)
The corner of 1st Street and Cherry Street in downtown Frisco is one of three street signs that will be replaced following City Council's approval of the use of a numeral abbreviation for 1st Street. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

The corner of 1st Street and Cherry Street in downtown Frisco is one of three street signs that will be replaced following City Council's approval of the use of a numeral abbreviation for 1st Street. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

Some residents and businesses in downtown Frisco may soon see name changes to their streets that will not actually affect the pronunciations of those roadways.

Frisco City Council recently approved an ordinance renaming First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Seventh streets using numerals to abbreviate the names.

“Over the years, the street names have not been consistent,” Frisco Development Services Director John Lettellier said. “Sometimes it’s been ‘1st’; other times it’s been ‘First.’ It’s listed different ways on site plans [and] plats, so [we said,] ‘Let’s just do an ordinance and get it all cleared up.’”

Prior to presenting the ordinance to council for consideration, Lettellier said city staff met with the Frisco Downtown Advisory Board and Frisco Downtown Merchants Association and did not receive any objections to the name changes. City staff also verified that the abbreviations would not interfere with any U.S. Postal Service or Frisco Police Department procedures.

“We don’t just go out and change a street name,” Lettellier said. “When you’ve got people or businesses along that street, that impacts them.”


Lettellier said residents and business owners on those streets likely will not even need to update any records, as most of the streets are already labeled with the numeral abbreviations.

City staff found all the street signs on the newly renamed 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th streets already reflected the changes, and just three signs at intersections on what is now officially 1st Street will need to be replaced.

In a document prepared for council, city staff estimated replacing the three street signs at the corners of 1st and Walnut; 1st and Cherry; and 1st and North County would cost Frisco $450.
By William C. Wadsack

Senior Reporter, Plano/Richardson

William joined Community Impact Newspaper in December 2019. He previously served as managing editor of several daily and weekly publications in North Texas and his native state of Louisiana.



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