Frisco confirms local mosquito pool tested positive for West Nile

Frisco confirmed a mosquito pool in the city had tested positive for West Nile Virus on May 29. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)
Frisco confirmed a mosquito pool in the city had tested positive for West Nile Virus on May 29. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

Frisco confirmed a mosquito pool in the city had tested positive for West Nile Virus on May 29. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

Frisco announced May 29 that a mosquito pool just south of downtown had tested positive for West Nile Virus.

In a news release announcing the positive test, city officials said they would be increasing surveillance efforts and treating areas of stagnant water along Hickory Street near Oakbrook Park with larvicide.


City officials said this was the first positive pool in the city this season, and no human cases of the virus have been confirmed in Frisco.

“With all the recent rainfall, it’s important for people to remember to drain the standing water around their homes," Environmental Health Supervisor Julie Fernandez said. "Although not all mosquito species transmit the disease, it just takes one bite from an infected mosquito to do so. That’s why we’re increasing surveillance all over our city and will be larviciding any areas where we see stagnant water.”

Frisco began testing for mosquitoes May 1.
By William C. Wadsack
William C. Wadsack is editor of the Frisco edition of Community Impact Newspaper. He previously served as managing editor of several daily and weekly publications in North Texas and his native state of Louisiana before joining Community Impact Newspaper in 2019.


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