Frisco addresses Petland concerns with updated animal ordinance

Cile Holloway speaks to the Frisco City Council in opposition of the proposed revisions to the city's animal ordinance on Jan. 21. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)
Cile Holloway speaks to the Frisco City Council in opposition of the proposed revisions to the city's animal ordinance on Jan. 21. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

Cile Holloway speaks to the Frisco City Council in opposition of the proposed revisions to the city's animal ordinance on Jan. 21. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Frisco City Council approved an updated animal ordinance that revises regulations on the sale of animals within the city during its regular meeting Jan. 21.

The council unanimously passed the revised ordinance despite the objection of a number of residents who spoke against it.

“The focus has been to do what we can with the ordinance that exists—to improve it so that the regulation of the sale of animals is improved,” Deputy City Manager Henry J. Hill said to the council during a work session before the regular meeting.

Hill said the ordinance provides for potential purchasers of an animal to get the kind of information they would need to make an intelligent choice about that purchase, including where the animal came from, how it got to Frisco and what has happened to it in the store.

The ordinance includes provisions that carry criminal and civil penalties, or could result in the permit to sell animals being suspended or revoked, if violated. Under the revised ordinance, pet store permits will be issued by the Frisco Police Department, and the chief of police will designate an animal services officer to enforce the provisions of the ordinance.


Staff initially presented a draft of the updated ordinance to the council at a Dec. 3 work session, but the Jan. 21 meeting was the first vote on it. Numerous residents have called on Frisco to update its animal ordinance following an investigation last year by the Humane Society of the United States into the Frisco Petland location, which accused the store of animal mistreatment.

Sixteen citizens expressed their opinions on the ordinance to the council, with the majority of them expressing disappointment with the scope of the revisions, though several spoke in support of the city’s plan. One of the most common suggestions from those who spoke against the ordinance was about a need for a local rescue and adoption center.

Rebecca Whitehouse was one of nine citizens who spoke in opposition of the ordinance.

“Rules on paper are only as good as the enforcement that's behind them,” Whitehouse said. “What's missing in this ordinance is a commitment to ensure that the problems that these citizens have been bringing to you—if these problems continue there will be penalties and there will indeed be consequences.”

Petland General Manager Josh Nie spoke in support of the ordinance, stating he “looks forward to working with the city” to be in full compliance.

“We all know this has been such a huge item because we all love animals,” Nie said. “At the end of the day, we’re here because of that; that drives us every day.”

The ordinance will also prohibit the sale of animals born outside the U.S. and require information on the earliest known origin of dogs and cats be provided to purchasers. It also modifies or sets requirements on pet stores in the areas of care and feeding; housing; sanitation; veterinary treatment; and record keeping on the acquisition, transportation and status of the animal while in the pet store.

“While we haven’t been able to adopt all of the suggestions and changes that came from the various animal interest groups that came to you,” Hill said to the council during the work session, “we adopted a lot of them, and the ordinance is better for being able to put those provisions in there.”
By William C. Wadsack
William C. Wadsack is editor of the Frisco edition of Community Impact Newspaper. He previously served as managing editor of several daily and weekly publications in North Texas and his native state of Louisiana before joining Community Impact Newspaper in 2019.


MOST RECENT

Learn more about Sai Krishna, incumbent Brian Livingston and Sadaf Haq, the candidates for Frisco City Council, Place 6 ahead of the November general election. (Community Impact staff)
Q&A: Candidates for Frisco City Council, Place 6 discuss relevant city issues

Learn more about Sai Krishna, incumbent Brian Livingston and Sadaf Haq, the candidates for Frisco City Council, Place 6 ahead of the November general election.

The outdoor kitchen manufacturer offers barbecue grills and fire pits from its outdoor kitchen showroom. (Elizabeth Uclés/Community Impact Newspaper)
Paradise Grills opens in Frisco and more DFW news

Read the latest business and community news from the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

ballot box, 2020 voter guide
November 2020 election: Here are the local, statewide candidates on the ballot for Collin County residents

This is your guide to the November 2020 ballot and important election dates to know in Collin County.

presentation at meeting
Here are 5 updates on upcoming projects in Frisco

City staff and outside contractors gave Frisco City Council updates on the PGA of America development, the new Frisco Public Library, a downtown pedestrian plaza, the new municipal court building and the performing arts center.

McKinney ISD's COVID-19 dashboard details total student and staff lab-confirmed positive cases of the virus by school and building. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
See the five most popular stories on our website in the DFW area for Sept.

Read the top stories in September on Community Impact Newspaper's website from the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

The Emergency Donut Vehicle makes regular visits to local neighborhoods on behalf of Hurts Donut Co. (Courtesy Hurts Donut Co.)
Frisco's Hurts Donut Co. travels to neighborhoods and more DFW news

Read the latest Dallas-Fort Worth business and community news.

The outdoor kitchen manufacturer offers barbecue grills and fire pits from its outdoor kitchen showroom. (Elizabeth Uclés/Community Impact Newspaper)
Paradise Grills now offering barbecue grills, fire pits in Frisco

The outdoor kitchen manufacturer opened along Preston Road in May.

The indoor hatchet-throwing venue allows guests to book ax-throwing sessions and private parties. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Indoor ax-throwing venue Stumpy’s Hatchet House coming to Frisco in 2021

The indoor hatchet-throwing venue allows guests to book ax-throwing sessions and private parties.

The Frisco ISD board of trustees approved its a rate of $1.3102 per $100 property valuation at the Sept. 28 special meeting. (Elizabeth Ucles/Community Impact Newspaper)
Frisco ISD approves lowest tax rate in over 20 years

The decreased tax rate will save the average Frisco ISD taxpayer around $92 this year, according to district officials.

Collin County commissioners update the county subdivision regulations during their Sept. 28 meeting. (Screenshot courtesy Collin County)
Collin County approves updates to subdivision regulations

Collin County commissioners approved updates to the existing county subdivision regulations during their Sept. 28 meeting.

Bavette Grill offers modern American fare, including menu items such as the short rib mac and cheese. (Courtesy Bavette Grill)
Bavette Grill opens in Plano and more DFW news

Read the latest business and community news from the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

The menu consists of meat dishes that are slow-roasted over an open fire. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Brazilian Steakhouse coming to Plano and more DFW business and community news from September

Read business and community news from September from Community Impact Newspaper's coverage of the Dallas-Fort Worth area.