Lookin Sharp Family Barbershop seeks to serve all ages, hair types

Michelle Bronson (left) and Sinead Shirley run Lookin Sharp Family Barbershop in Frisco. (Lindsey Juarez Monsivais/Community Impact Newspaper)
Michelle Bronson (left) and Sinead Shirley run Lookin Sharp Family Barbershop in Frisco. (Lindsey Juarez Monsivais/Community Impact Newspaper)

Michelle Bronson (left) and Sinead Shirley run Lookin Sharp Family Barbershop in Frisco. (Lindsey Juarez Monsivais/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Shirley trims a customer's beard. (Lindsey Juarez Monsivais/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Shirley takes time to make an even cut. (Lindsey Juarez Monsivais/Community Impact Newspaper)
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One of the barbershop's specialties is using a straight razor for trims and shaves. (Lindsey Juarez Monsivais/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Bronson evens out the haircut on a customer. (Lindsey Juarez Monsivais/Community Impact Newspaper)
Sinead Shirley and Michelle Bronson had been •working together in the barber industry for several years when they noticed a pattern in other barbershops.

"We noticed all these barber shops in the area were segregated, like, fancy men or men’s only, women’s only,” Shirley said. “We wanted a really relaxed environment where you can bring your whole family to get a haircut.”

In 2018, Shirley and Bronson found a storefront in Frisco formerly used for a full-service salon and opened Lookin Sharp Family Barber Shop in that space. Their barbershop, located off of Gary Burns Drive, offers haircuts, shaves and trims for all ages.

The co-owners both worked in franchise salons before opening Lookin Sharp. Shirley said the community has been supportive of the locally and female-owned barbershop.

“I didn’t really envision what it would be like, but I feel like it’s better than what I thought it would be,” Shirley said.


Each barber at the shop brings a different mix of skills to the table, Shirley said. Combined, the barbers have more than 60 years of experience in the industry.

One of the shop’s specialties is using a straight razor for neck trims and shaves, which allows the cut to last longer, Shirley said.

While many barbershops cater to specific age groups, Lookin Sharp’s barbers will cut hair for all ages, Bronson said. The barbershop will happily offer kids a toy or a lollipop to keep them distracted during the haircut, Shirley said.

Shirley said she and Bronson plan to keep the shop open for a few years before opening a second location.

Shirley said Lookin Sharp differentiates itself from some other barbershops because it is a welcoming space for everyone.

“We try to keep it pretty professional in here but still a family-friendly environment,” she said.

Lookin Sharp Family Barbershop

8745 Gary Burns Drive, Ste. 128

469-294-0125

www.lookinsharpfamilybarbershop.com

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. noon-6 p.m.
By Lindsey Juarez
Lindsey has been involved in newspapers in some form since high school. She graduated magna cum laude from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2014 with a degree in Journalism. While attending UTA, she worked for The Shorthorn, the university's award-winning student newspaper. She was hired as Community Impact Newspaper's first Frisco reporter in 2014. Less than a year later, she took over as the editor of the Frisco edition. Since then, she has covered a variety of topics and issues important to the community, including the city's affordable housing shortage, the state's controversial A-F school accountability system and the city's "Bury the Lines" efforts.


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