Get to know Dripping Springs ISD Superintendent Todd Washburn

A photo of Todd Washburn sitting behind a desk.
Todd Washburn has assumed his position as Dripping Springs ISD superintendent. (Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)

Todd Washburn has assumed his position as Dripping Springs ISD superintendent. (Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)

Image description
Todd Washburn officially assumed his role as Dripping Springs ISD superintendent Nov. 21. Formerly an associate superintendent with Eanes ISD, Washburn has lived in Dripping Springs since 2016. He sat down with Community Impact Newspaper on his second official day on the job to discuss his new role.

What drew you to live in the Dripping Springs community?

It was a fast-growing district with very high standards academically. It felt like the community had a very traditional focus, that community values were very important, and we just loved the area where Dripping Springs is. You have that appeal of being close to Austin but outside of Austin, kind of that small-town feel and flavor of Dripping Springs. Where I grew up, it was a very small town as well, so I guess that kind of led me to want to be relocated here in Dripping Springs. I just saw this as a great community to be plugged into and get engaged with.

What drew you toward the Dripping Springs ISD superintendent position?

What drew me as a prospective superintendent was the reputation of the district. The programs and opportunities that are being provided here in Dripping Springs are definitely appealing, and I would definitely say Dripping Springs is really one of the best destinations if you’re moving to the Austin area, with the fast growth—and the school system and the schools here are outstanding. I think it’s a great place to raise children, although I’ve already done that.


Do you have any ideas for new programming you would like to bring to the district?

I’m always looking at [what] some of the latest trends are and what the job market data is telling us to make sure we’re providing those opportunities for students to experience some of those ongoing trends so that they can be successful. I believe a lot of times, it’s important for students to experience it to know what they want to do but also what they don’t want to do. Providing those opportunities helps students sort out what kind of path they want to take beyond high school.

What is your mindset moving into this continued period of growth for the district?

Being in Leander for over 20 years, I had the opportunity to experience a rapid-growth school district and have personally been a part of opening multiple new campuses. I do know that as a school district and community grows, it’s important that you hold onto and value those traditions and community values and beliefs and that you honor the past but also prepare for the future.

What do you want the community to know about you?

My passion is education. My passion is working with students, teachers, parents and [the] community to develop a culture that is innovative, creative and collaborative. I’m excited to be here in Dripping Springs. I feel like it’s such a great opportunity for all of our stakeholders because we’re in a space and time when we’re going to see growth, and with growth creates greater opportunities for our students and opportunities to set the path for the future of Dripping Springs ISD and the Dripping Springs community. I’m excited to be a part of that.
By Olivia Aldridge
Olivia is the reporter for Community Impact's Southwest Austin edition. She graduated from Presbyterian College with a bachelor's degree in English and creative writing in 2017. Olivia was a reporter and producer at South Carolina Public Radio in Columbia, South Carolina before joining Community Impact in Austin.


MOST RECENT

Rapid nasal swab antigen tests are recommended as options for individuals who were potentially exposed to a confirmed positive carrier, as well as for people traveling, returning to work or undergoing a medical procedure. (Courtesy Total Primary Care)
Find out where to get a 15-minute COVID-19 test in Austin, Dallas-Fort Worth metros

Rapid nasal swab antigen tests are recommended as options for individuals who were potentially exposed to a confirmed positive carrier, as well as for people traveling, returning to work or undergoing a medical procedure.

A mother and daughter visit at Seasons Assisted Living & Memory Care in Conroe earlier in the pandemic. (Courtesy Seasons Assisted Living & Memory Care)
Texas allows limited visitations to nursing homes, long-term care facilities

Facilities that meet the requirements will allow limited visitations, but you still will not be able to hug or kiss your loved one.

Austin ISD trustees approved a new school calendar Aug. 7, delaying the start of the school year until Sept. 8. (Courtesy Austin ISD)
Austin ISD officially delays start of school year until Sept. 8

The district could also extend virtual learning into November based on an approved Texas Education Agency waiver.

Austin Public Health will resume providing coronavirus testing for individuals without symptoms. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Asymptomatic coronavirus tests now available through Austin Public Health

Despite relative progress in county efforts to contain the virus, Dr. Mark Escott has urged the community to stay vigilant in social distancing and wearing masks.

Two events will be held in South Austin on Aug. 8 to distribute school supplies. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
School supply distribution events at two South Austin locations Aug. 8

The items will be placed in the trunk of vehicles that pull up to the schools, and walk-up groups will also be served.

Houston-based vintage clothing store Pavement will open in Austin on Aug. 14. (Courtesy Pavement)
South Austin news: Pavement opens new vintage store, YMCA offering child care and more

YMCA of Austin and Extend-A-Care will be offering full-day child care to supervise virtual learning at 10 locations, including Galindo Elementary School.

Austin Mayor Steve Adler (Courtesy ATXN)
Austin mayor pushes for new ideas in policing, $100M cut to police budget during State of the City address

Austin Mayor Steve Adler also said the city needs a police chief who will champion change.

A teal coronavirus graphic
Travis County adds 202 new coronavirus cases Aug. 5

The county has confirmed 22,024 cases of the virus, with an estimated 20,059 recoveries.

Wonderspaces Austin
Interactive art gallery Wonderspaces opens in Austin and 3 other events to check out

Here is a list of events to safely check out in the coming weeks in and around Austin.