Do-Rite Barbecue at Graceland aims to create a super-prime, classic barbecue experience

Do-Rite Director of Operations Lynn Metcalf stands by the Do-Rite welcome sign. After opening as a Stubb's satellite in 2015, Do-Rite rebranded as an independent operation in 2018.(Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)
Do-Rite Director of Operations Lynn Metcalf stands by the Do-Rite welcome sign. After opening as a Stubb's satellite in 2015, Do-Rite rebranded as an independent operation in 2018.(Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)

Do-Rite Director of Operations Lynn Metcalf stands by the Do-Rite welcome sign. After opening as a Stubb's satellite in 2015, Do-Rite rebranded as an independent operation in 2018.(Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)

Image description
Do-Rite staffer Jenny Arthur prepares brisket. Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper
Image description
Do-Rite offers meats, such as turkey and brisket, as well as sides. (Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)
Image description
Do-Rite at Graceland has ample outdoor seating and a playscape. (Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)
Image description
Do-Rite Barbecue has three additional locations.
When Do-Rite Barbecue’s director of operations, Lynn Metcalf, got her start in the barbecue industry years ago, she was not a fan of the classic Texas cuisine and even did a stint as a vegetarian. It is a testament to Do-Rite Barbecue’s menu, Metcalf said, that she is “crazy about [Do-Rite’s] brisket” today.

That brisket is the creation of pitmaster Francisco “Chano” Ortiz—a 20-year industry veteran—who Metcalf said is on a sacred mission.

“He’s been working with our owner seeking this divine brisket experience—the perfect amount of smoke flavor, the most beautiful bark,” Metcalf said.

Brisket is not the only star of the show. According to Metcalf, the Do-Rite staff takes pride in their spicy, pit-smoked turkey and sides. While Metcalf said many barbecue joints are too focused on labor-intensive meat preparation to offer varied side items, she said Do-Rite has made innovative sides a priority, with choices like creamy serrano-spiked spinach and mashed sweet potatoes.

Do-Rite, however, has had an evolving identity. The restaurant originally opened in 2015 as a satellite location of Stubb’s, the downtown Austin music venue and barbecue restaurant. After a trademark dispute over the Stubb’s name resulted in the separation of Stubb’s from its satellite locations in September 2018, Metcalf and others took on Do-Rite—named for a business that previously occupied Stubb’s downtown property—as an independent project, with the other former Stubb’s satellites under their wing.

The flagship location at Graceland has developed as a casual, family-friendly outdoor dining destination with a live music stage, playscapes for kids and a full-service bar for adults. After surpassing a year in business as Do-Rite this fall, Metcalf said she is starting to feel the business has transcended its origin story, and Do-Rite’s own “brand consciousness” is emerging in Austin.

“I think our product is at an arrival point of a really long process,” Metcalf said. “Even though we’re a young name, the staff that’s been working on this product has been intact for a long time.”

Metcalf said that in her view, no amount of menu innovation can compete with a seasoned staff making a great product.

“We are making just a super-prime, classic experience,” Metcalf said.
Do-Rite Barbecue at Graceland


8600 W. Hwy. 290, Austin


512-792-9778




Hours: Thu.-Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., closed Mon.-Wed.
By Olivia Aldridge
Olivia is the reporter for Community Impact's Southwest Austin edition. She graduated from Presbyterian College with a bachelor's degree in English and creative writing in 2017. Olivia was a reporter and producer at South Carolina Public Radio in Columbia, South Carolina before joining Community Impact in Austin.


MOST RECENT

A mother and daughter visit at Seasons Assisted Living & Memory Care in Conroe earlier in the pandemic. (Courtesy Seasons Assisted Living & Memory Care)
Texas allows limited visitations to nursing homes, long-term care facilities

Facilities that meet the requirements will allow limited visitations, but you still will not be able to hug or kiss your loved one.

Austin ISD trustees approved a new school calendar Aug. 7, delaying the start of the school year until Sept. 8. (Courtesy Austin ISD)
Austin ISD officially delays start of school year until Sept. 8

The district could also extend virtual learning into November based on an approved Texas Education Agency waiver.

Austin Public Health will resume providing coronavirus testing for individuals without symptoms. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Asymptomatic coronavirus tests now available through Austin Public Health

Despite relative progress in county efforts to contain the virus, Dr. Mark Escott has urged the community to stay vigilant in social distancing and wearing masks.

Two events will be held in South Austin on Aug. 8 to distribute school supplies. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
School supply distribution events at two South Austin locations Aug. 8

The items will be placed in the trunk of vehicles that pull up to the schools, and walk-up groups will also be served.

Houston-based vintage clothing store Pavement will open in Austin on Aug. 14. (Courtesy Pavement)
South Austin news: Pavement opens new vintage store, YMCA offering child care and more

YMCA of Austin and Extend-A-Care will be offering full-day child care to supervise virtual learning at 10 locations, including Galindo Elementary School.

Austin Mayor Steve Adler (Courtesy ATXN)
Austin mayor pushes for new ideas in policing, $100M cut to police budget during State of the City address

Austin Mayor Steve Adler also said the city needs a police chief who will champion change.

A teal coronavirus graphic
Travis County adds 202 new coronavirus cases Aug. 5

The county has confirmed 22,024 cases of the virus, with an estimated 20,059 recoveries.

Wonderspaces Austin
Interactive art gallery Wonderspaces opens in Austin and 3 other events to check out

Here is a list of events to safely check out in the coming weeks in and around Austin.

A camp is set up by someone experiencing homelessness in August 2019. (Christopher Neely/Community Impact Newspaper)
Petition to reinstate Austin's homeless camping ban ruled invalid by city clerk

The group behind the petition said "this fight is not over."