Crepe Crazy serves sweet and savory options at two locations

Crepe Crazy offers a selection of crepes. Pictured here is the Sweet Cheese Delight.

Crepe Crazy offers a selection of crepes. Pictured here is the Sweet Cheese Delight.

Image description
Crepe Crazy
Image description
Crepe Crazy
Image description
Crepe Crazy
Image description
Crepe Crazy
Image description
Crepe Crazy

Inside Crepe Crazy—a restaurant nestled in a European-style cottage in Dripping Springs—the menu is written on a chalkboard that covers most of the wall. Next to the list of sweet and savory options, the words “Point and ye shall receive” give a clue as to what makes the local cafe unique.


“First and foremost, this is [a] deaf family-owned and -operated company,” founder Inna Giterman wrote on a notepad during an interview with Community Impact Newspaper. “We founded [Crepe Crazy] with intentions of giving deaf people an opportunity to showcase their skills when others wouldn’t.”


Giterman’s love for crepes—or “blinis” as they are known in her home country of Ukraine—is deeply rooted in family, she explained.


“Crepes are something we grew up with,” she wrote. “[We had] no prior culinary experience, but nearly everybody in this family enjoys cooking, trying new recipes [and] getting creative with food.”


Opening a restaurant as a deaf, immigrant family was extremely difficult, she explained—from overcoming language barriers to navigating development regulations.


After years of selling crepes at fairs and festivals, Giterman opened a brick-and-mortar location May 8, 2014, in Dripping Springs. A year and a half later—Dec. 3, 2015—she opened a second Crepe Crazy location on South Lamar Boulevard in Austin.


The menu includes sweet crepes—topped with whipped cream and powdered sugar—and savory crepes—served with a side salad and lemon-garlic vinaigrette. Crepe Crazy features a crepe of the month, which is the Hatch Green Chile Chicken crepe for the month of September.


Best-selling savory offerings include the turkey and avocado crepe and chicken basil pesto, Giterman indicated. The classic Nutella Royale sweet crepe “tops the list every time” she wrote.


“Our menu consists of carefully curated options with a nod to many regions,” she wrote. “It is more than just feel-good nostalgic food, and we are grateful to be able to share crepes with [the community].”

By Taylor Jackson Buchanan
Taylor Buchanan joined Community Impact Newspaper in 2018 after completing a master of journalism degree from the University of Texas. She worked as the senior reporter for Community Impact's Southwest Austin edition and is now the editor for the company's flagship Round Rock/Pflugerville/Hutto edition.


MOST RECENT

The 6.5-mile project will be an important connection for the pedestrian, bicycle and transit networks, according to city officials. (Courtesy Austin Public Works)
City of Austin begins design of urban trail on abandoned rail corridor

The city, along with the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, won a state award for a Bergstrom Spur Trail study.

Consuelo Mendez Middle School has consistently received poor ratings from the Texas Education Agency. (Community Impact Newspaper)
CI TEXAS ROUNDUP: State could take over AISD school board if poorly-rated campus does not improve; new furniture store to open in McKinney and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas in Texas as of Dec. 3.

Derrick Chubbs is leaving Austin for a food bank in Florida. (Courtsey Central Texas Food Bank)
Central Texas Food Bank CEO Derrick Chubbs steps down

Derrick Chubbs is leaving Austin for a food bank in Florida.

Consuelo Mendez Middle School has consistently received poor ratings from the Texas Education Agency. (Community Impact Newspaper)
State could take over AISD school board if poorly rated campus does not improve next year

If the school does receive an improved rating, the state's commissioner of education could replace every member of Austin ISD's school board.

Austin ISD trustee Noelita Lugo argues for breaking down student achievement measures by race in the district's 2021-2026 scorecard, rather than examining only economically disadvantaged students without racial groups. (Maggie Quinlan/Community Impact Newspaper)
Austin ISD considers how to measure equity gaps in academic achievement

Austin ISD trustees are continuing to work out details of the 2021-2026 district scorecard, which measures progress on equity goals.

Austin City Council made changes to arts and library funding among other decisions Dec. 2. (Maggie Quinlan/Community Impact Newspaper)
Austin City Hall notebook: Arts community, homeless health care program get funding, plus other actions

City Council approved more than 50 items Dec. 2, changing the Office of Civil Rights, doling out funding and more.

Council Member Greg Casar speaks at a press conference outside City Hall ahead of a vote to approve an ordinance granting the Austin Office of Civil Rights enforcement power. (Maggie Quinlan/Community Impact Newspaper)
Austin Office of Civil Rights granted new powers

An ordinance passed by Austin City Council on Dec. 2 creates additional civil and criminal penalties for discrimination.

The school board will consider whether to call a special election to fill the vacancy or make an appointment. (Zara Flores/Community Impact Newspaper)
CI TEXAS ROUNDUP: Hays CISD to hold special meeting on resignation of board member; Montgomery approves plan for downtown and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas in Texas as of Dec. 2.

The existing gallery location on South Lamar Boulevard will close on Dec. 20. (Courtesy Ao5 Gallery)
Ao5 Gallery relocating from South Austin to The Arboretum this winter

With the relocation to Northwest Austin, Ao5 Gallery will expand its custom framing services, have better parking, be able to display more art and be able to accommodate more guests for live events, according to officials with the gallery.

Rendering of Tesla's Cybertruck
Tesla officially names Texas gigafactory as its new headquarters

A U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing shows the Travis County manufacturing plant as Tesla's new home base.

The state and the city of Austin had already exhausted rental assistance funding from the federal program. (Benton Graham/Community Impact Newspaper)
Travis County hits pause on rental assistance applications as federal dollars dry up

With surging demand and the scheduled eviction moratorium expiring in December, Travis County is facing a possible shortfall in Emergency Rental Assistance Program funding.