AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine offers Eastern medicine, herbal treatments and acupuncture

Dr. Mary Faria is the CEO and acting president of the AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine.

Dr. Mary Faria is the CEO and acting president of the AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine.

Image description
AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine
Image description
AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine
Image description
AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine

Flu shots. Blood work. Often, patients see a physician wielding a needle and brace for a jolt of pain. However, at AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine, acupuncturists use needles—alongside herbs—to reduce chronic pain, allergies and other ailments, said Dr. Mary Faria, the school’s CEO and acting president.


“AOMA is a wonderful academic environment that’s training people to practice various aspects of Eastern medicine,” she said.


Founded in 1993, AOMA is celebrating 25 years this fall. The mission is twofold—provide holistic, integrated health care and remain a renowned school of Chinese medicine, Faria said. Of the roughly 60 schools of Eastern medicine in the United States, she said AOMA is ranked No. 5. Currently 151 students are enrolled in AOMA’s masters and doctoral programs.


“This medicine has transformed each of our students’ lives in some way,” Faria said. “They want to get involved in practicing this medicine. They want to give back.”


The school has a library, classrooms, a clinic and an herbal dispensary. The dispensary holds over 350 jars of bulk, raw herbs, herbal extracts and blends. All the products are chemical- and pesticide-free, she said.


AOMA has two local clinics—in South Austin on West Gate Boulevard and Anderson Lane in Central Austin. Practitioners—students supervised by faculty and professional acupuncturists—complete around 17,500 appointments a year, Faria said.


The school offers a free community wellness hour, Thursdays at 12:45 p.m., with nada acupuncture—five needles placed around the ears for stress relief—and a guided meditation.


“There’s very little that acupuncture and herbal treatment combined cannot treat,” Faria said. “This medicine has been around for thousands of years.”

SHARE THIS STORY


MOST RECENT

The city of Austin will begin charging a $0.15 per trip regulatory fee on shared mobility vehicles in early 2020. Community Impact Staff
City of Austin will implement a $0.15 regulatory fee on shared mobility rides

The city of Austin will begin charging a $0.15 per trip regulatory fee on shared mobility vehicles, which include electric bikes and scooters, Austin Transportation Director Robert Spillar wrote in a Dec. 10 memo to City Council.

A photo of Dripping Springs City Council sitting in their chambers.
Dripping Springs City Council reappoints member John Kroll after absences result in vacated seat

Council member John Kroll was reappointed to Dripping Springs City Council Dec. 10.

Travis County commissioners are considering a proposed RV development on Stagecoach Ranch Road in Dripping Springs, less than a half mile from the Hamilton Pool Preserve.
Travis County commissioners delay approving RV park proposal near Hamilton Pool Preserve as residents raise concern

For the second week in a row, dozens of Dripping Springs residents filled the Travis County Commissioners Court chambers, prepared to speak in opposition to a proposed RV park at 401 Stagecoach Ranch Road, less than a half mile away from the Hamilton Pool Preserve.

Travis County commissioners voted to allow staff to begin contract negotiations for a new women's jail facility at a Dec. 10 meeting. (Courtesy Travis County Sheriff's Office)
Travis County begins contract negotiations for women’s jail facility as overall jail population continues to decline

The county has planned to build a new, separate women’s facility for years, despite some pushback from local activists.

A photo of the exterior of Flying Fish Swim Academy.
Flying Fish Swim Academy celebrates Dripping Springs opening

A new facility offering swimming lessons has opened in Dripping Springs.

The Microtel Inn and Suites is located in Southeast Austin, only a 4.5-mile drive from the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport. (Courtesy Google Maps)
Zoning concern prevents Austin from moving forward with second conversion of hotel to homeless shelter

Officials have already indicated they are eyeing other hotels and motels for purchase and conversion into homeless shelters.

This is the Estancia property that was purchased by Texas Children's on Dec. 10. (Courtesy Texas Children's Hospital)
Texas Children’s Hospital eyes further expansion in Austin with purchases of land

Houston-based Texas Children's Hospital has closed on the purchase of two plots of land in the Austin area.

Common winter allergies in Texas are caused by pollen from the Ashe juniper—also known as a mountain cedar. The tree is native to the area. (Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)
As pollen counts rise in Central Texas, learn about cedar fever and allergy prevention

As temperatures cool heading into the winter season in Central Texas, pollen counts from Ashe juniper trees begin to climb, causing seasonal allergies referred to locally by residents as “cedar fever.”

A photo of Todd Washburn sitting behind a desk.
Get to know Dripping Springs ISD Superintendent Todd Washburn

New Dripping Springs ISD Superintendent Todd Washburn sits down for a Q&A.

A photo of the sign for Code 1 Concierge Care
Code 1 Concierge Care brings medical services to South Austin

Code 1 Concierge Care opened its doors Dec. 1.

Back to top