South Pleasant Valley Road corridor mobility plan shows proposed connections south to Slaughter Lane

A rendering shows a possible future South Pleasant Valley bridge over Onion Creek Metropolitan Park and Onion Creek in South Austin. (Rendering courtesy Austin Corridor Program Office)
A rendering shows a possible future South Pleasant Valley bridge over Onion Creek Metropolitan Park and Onion Creek in South Austin. (Rendering courtesy Austin Corridor Program Office)

A rendering shows a possible future South Pleasant Valley bridge over Onion Creek Metropolitan Park and Onion Creek in South Austin. (Rendering courtesy Austin Corridor Program Office)

In July, the Austin Corridor Program Office released its updated mobility plan for the South Pleasant Valley Road corridor, which runs in Southeast Austin from Oltorf Street to Slaughter Lane.

Development of the plan was funded through the city of Austin’s 2016 mobility bond, and outlines goals to enhance mobility, safety and connectivity along the roadway, according to ACPO. Funding for future construction along the corridor has not yet been secured.

A major part of the plan is creating a continuous corridor from Oltorf to Slaughter Lane, utilizing sections of South Pleasant Valley, Burleson Road, Todd Lane and Nuckols Crossing Road.

Currently, Pleasant Valley is a disjointed roadway, with gaps at which the road ends and then resumes in a different location or along a different road. A goal of the corridor plan would connect these gaps, which includes a 0.1-mile gap south of Oltorf, a 0.8-mile section through Onion Creek Metropolitan Park and a 0.4-mile gap between Nuckols Crossing and Slaughter.

According to the plan, three different options are being considered for the first gap south of Oltorf. For the gap at Onion Creek Metropolitan Park, the project would build a bridge over a portion of the park and Onion Creek, with pedestrian accommodations along the bridge and possibly underneath. The future segment for the final gap would be built on currently undeveloped land.


The plan also outlines a network of existing and future bike lanes and sidewalks that would connect to those found on neighborhood roads.

An estimated cost for the project overall is between $153 million and $335 million, according to the mobility plan, which would include land acquisition, final design and construction.

The plan can be found here.