Tres Reynas property highlights a community of unique local artists

The art community includes from left: Diane Bertotti, Maksimovic Jovan, Alison Cairns, Miguel Del Pozo, Ariane Bihan, Trina Barlow, Wylie Fraze and Alexia Maher. (Photos by Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)
The art community includes from left: Diane Bertotti, Maksimovic Jovan, Alison Cairns, Miguel Del Pozo, Ariane Bihan, Trina Barlow, Wylie Fraze and Alexia Maher. (Photos by Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)

The art community includes from left: Diane Bertotti, Maksimovic Jovan, Alison Cairns, Miguel Del Pozo, Ariane Bihan, Trina Barlow, Wylie Fraze and Alexia Maher. (Photos by Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Austin Craft Lounge is located at Tres Reynas. (Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Sisters Alexia Maher and Ariane Bihan founded Authenticaa.
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Authenticaa has “practical” art, such as bookends. (Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Tres Reynas includes a barn. (Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Equine trainer Laura Hermanson offers lessons at Tres Reynas.
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Tres Reynas includes a barn. (Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Groups or individuals can create works at Austin Craft Lounge.
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Austin Craft Lounge projects include painting and putting together small pieces. (Nicholas Cicale/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Authenticaa makes art pieces that combine wood and metalwork.
Along Nutty Brown Road on the outskirts of Southwest Austin, a large, hammer-shaped mailbox marks the entrance of Tres Reynas, a property that is home to a collection of local artists.

Anchored by the Austin Craft Lounge, Tres Reynas is owned by Miguel Del Pozo. He said he opened the 4.8-acre property in early 2018, which currently includes three art studios, the craft lounge and a barn that he inherited when he purchased the property.

“It’s really become a community of artists and creative small businesses that everybody needs each other,” said Trina Barlow, the marketing director for many of the businesses. “When you’re starting out as a small business it’s not easy, so it’s really cool to have a shared purpose.”

Artists each bring different talents and different cultures to the group, with Barlow jokingly calling them “the U.N. of Dripping Springs.” The group has members who represent Mexico, Serbia, France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy and the United States.

Del Pozo said that he is lucky Austin Craft Lounge co-owners Alison Cairns and Diane Bertotti joined him in his search for a property.


“It took us a while, but I’m glad that this one worked out,” he said. “It’s a combination of efforts. Their story is my story.”

Austin Craft Lounge

Cairns and Bertotti said they wanted to start a business that would bring people together to do something creative.

Cairns said they met Del Pozo while he was initially searching for a property, and Tres Reynas grew into a community of artist “all under one umbrella.”

Austin Craft Lounge offers do-it-yourself craft classes and open studio time to individuals and groups. Craft projects include making pillows; frames; pottery; small wood pieces; and other art, such as painting. Crafts are inspired and created by the artist at the neighboring studios, Bertotti said.

“Miguel has created a space where we can do that and we wouldn’t be able to otherwise,” Bertotti said.

Authenticaa

Owners and sisters Alexia Maher and Ariane Bihan said they began creating art six years ago in their garage as a way to have unique pieces. After looking for and failing to find a piece of art they were interested in, they decided to try to make something themselves.

“We just couldn’t find what we wanted,” Bihan said. “We started making things, and after trial and error, we ended up with a product that people really enjoyed.”

The duo’s art brings together reclaimed wood and metal. Maher said much of the art draws inspiration from nature, animals and family. Many pieces—like coat racks, key hangers and bookends— also serve a practical purpose, while some pieces are more colorful and created for kids rooms.

Bottles & Birds

Artist Wylie Fraze started his studio—Bottles & Birds—at the property to create art that uses wood and recycled glass bottles. For example, Fraze creates wooden bird feeders with a wine bottle used as the food dispenser.

Laura Hermanson

Equine trainer Laura Hermanson offers lessons at the barn located on the property, where she was based before Del Pozo purchased it. The barn houses mules, including Dyna, who was the first mule to compete in dressage—or artistic performance riding—against horses and was the subject of the documentary “Dyna Does Dressage.”

Del Pozo said having a farm was something new for him, and he had to learn how to interact with horses and the other animals present, including rabbits, chickens and ducks.

E Kiss Art

Owner and artist Elisa Kissinger creates pottery and sculptures with a kennel at the property. In her studio she creates works that frequently feature animals.

Tres Reynas

12919 Nutty Brown Road, Austin

Austin Craft Lounge

512-961-6101

www.austincraftlounge.com

Authenticaa

512-927-6579

www.authenticaa.com

Laura Hermanson

706-920-8660

Bottles & Birds

N/A

E Kiss Art

elisa@kissinger.com

www.facebook.com/ekiss-art-222433045367289

BY Nicholas Cicale



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