Austin Angels, a nonprofit serving children and families in foster care community, relocates to larger space in Buda

Austin Angels relocated to 401 FM 967, Buda, in February. (Zara Flores/Community Impact Newspaper)
Austin Angels relocated to 401 FM 967, Buda, in February. (Zara Flores/Community Impact Newspaper)

Austin Angels relocated to 401 FM 967, Buda, in February. (Zara Flores/Community Impact Newspaper)

Austin Angels, a nonprofit dedicated to helping children and families in the foster care community, relocated its headquarters to 401 RM 967, Buda, from 191 Cimarron Loop, Ste. A, Buda, in February.

Austin Angels was founded in 2009, serving those from San Marcos to Waco, and launched nationally in 2016, serving communities in 16 states.

The nonprofit moved into what used to be Resurrection Church on FM 967, which sits on a 2.5-acre lot, adding an extra 3,000 square feet of interior space to its headquarters compared to the previous office.

“We just have a lot of big dreams for it, and so much we’ve done has been limited by the space that we’ve had and now, no longer will be limited by space,” Executive Director Sara Hale said.

With the new space, the facility will not just be an office but will also serve as a foster care community center serving families and children in foster care where they can conduct strength assessments to match volunteers with a family or youth for the Dare to Dream mentorship program and provide other resources.


The Dare to Dream program matches a youth in foster care anywhere from 11-22 years old with a volunteer mentor to provide guidance and advice through 10 developmental milestones.

“For some kids, it’s the difference between homelessness and living independently,” Hale said.

Another program offered through Austin Angels is the Love Box program, the first ever pilot program of the nonprofit.

Volunteers are matched with a local foster family and commit to visiting them once a month for a year to offer support, relationship building, connection and mentorship.

“Sometimes a Love Box is just that, a physical box of items. Sometimes it’s toilet paper, diapers, wipes, groceries, [etc.]. It’s tailored to each family,” Hale said. “Maybe it’s just showing up and doing homework with the kids or throwing a ball outside—whatever the family needs, be it emotional or physical.”

The consistent support and connection that is received through the Love Box program can bring about astounding changes, she added.

“The model of our care is just that: consistent loving adults that are willing to walk alongside in the journey,” Hale said.

512-312-4500. www.austinangels.com
By Zara Flores
Zara joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in August 2021. Prior to CI, she interned at Picket Fence Media in Southern California and graduated from Cal State Fullerton where she was assistant news editor for the Daily Titan and copy editor for Tusk Magazine. Zara covers education, business, government and more for Buda, Kyle and San Marcos.