Analysis: Uber/Kyle partnership so far meeting expectations

A team from Texas State University presented findings to Kyle City Council on an ongoing ride-hailing partnership with Uber. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
A team from Texas State University presented findings to Kyle City Council on an ongoing ride-hailing partnership with Uber. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)

A team from Texas State University presented findings to Kyle City Council on an ongoing ride-hailing partnership with Uber. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)

After six months in operation, a program passed by Kyle officials designed to bring more access to affordable ride-sharing options for residents and visitors has so far met expectations.

This is according to a team from Texas State University, which examined the program implemented Oct. 6, called Uber Kyle 3.14.


The terms of the program stated customers in Kyle would pay the first $3.14 of any Uber ride as long as the ride starts and ends in the city of Kyle. The deal, which customers utilize through both the city of Kyle's app and the Uber app, then subsidizes rides for up to an additional $10, and then customers are responsible for the remainder of any cost beyond $13.14.

During Kyle's April 20 meeting, the Texas State team said the Kyle model would have to surpass 58 riders per day to exceed the city's budget—$150,000 for fiscal year 2020-21.

Data from the team projected the number of riders to be 2,532 by the end of the program's first year, or roughly 39 riders per day.



Texas State project member Joe Savak said it would be beneficial for the city to go after grants that could be used to help keep the program sustainable for the city.

The team also suggested implementing measures to raise awareness of the program.

"We believe it might be beneficial to add marketing opportunities," project member Megan Wills said. "One of the easiest ones we decided on was to make short videos."

Council did not take any action following the presentation and will continue the program.



By Brian Rash
Brian has been a reporter and editor since 2012. He wrote about the music scene in Dallas-Fort Worth before becoming managing editor for the Graham Leader in Graham, Texas, in 2013. He relocated to Austin, Texas, in 2015 to work for Gatehouse Media's large design hub. He became the editor for the Lake Travis-Westlake publication of Community Impact in August 2018. From there he became a dual-market editor for Community Impact's New Braunfels and San Marcos-Buda-Kyle editions. Brian is now a senior editor for the company's flagship papers, the Round Rock and Pflugerville-Hutto editions.