Election day 2021: Incumbents win races in San Marcos CISD, Hays CISD elections; bond propositions split

Three of Hays CISD's six bond propositions failed, but the largest one, with $147,959,876 on the line, was passed by Hays County voters. (Ali Linan/Community Impact Newspaper)
Three of Hays CISD's six bond propositions failed, but the largest one, with $147,959,876 on the line, was passed by Hays County voters. (Ali Linan/Community Impact Newspaper)

Three of Hays CISD's six bond propositions failed, but the largest one, with $147,959,876 on the line, was passed by Hays County voters. (Ali Linan/Community Impact Newspaper)

Updated at 9:55 p.m., May 1

Hays County has reported unofficial results for Hays CISD and San Marcos CISD elections.

Incumbent candidate Anne Halsey defeated five of her competitors in the race for an at-large board position on SMCISD's board of trustees with 1,083 votes over Mari Salmi, who had 886 votes.

In HCISD's board of trustees races, Courtney Runkle beat Richard W. Cronshey with 298 votes to 153 votes for the District 3 seat. For an at-large trustee position, incumbent Will McManus won the race with 1,359 ballots. Donyé Curry was the runner up with 1,010 votes.

There were also six bond propositions submitted by HCISD to voters, totaling about $238.5 million. Here are the voting totals for each.

  • Proposition A: There were 1,607 votes for the proposition, or 59.81%, and 1,080 votes against it.

  • Proposition B: There were 1,562 votes for the proposition, or 58.31%, and 1,117 votes against it.

  • Proposition C: There were 1,503 votes against the proposition, or 56.14%, and 1,174 votes for it.

  • Proposition D: There were 1,481 votes against the proposition, or 55.28%, and 1,198 votes for it.

  • Proposition E: There were 1,415 votes against the proposition, or 52.8%, and 1,265 votes for it.

  • Proposition F: There were 1,681 votes for the proposition, or 62.68%, and 1,001 votes against it.


A total of 8,740 ballots have been counted, which represents 6.2% of Hays County's 141,065 voters.


Elections are not final until results have been canvassed, and the county said it would post its remaining reports May 3.

Visit communityimpact.com/voter-guide/election-results to see results from all local elections in your community.

Original story

Hays County has released early voting totals for Hays CISD and San Marcos CISD elections.

Incumbent candidate Anne Halsey leads five of her competitors in the race for an at large board position on SMCISD's board of trustees with 587 votes over Mari Salmi, who has 465 votes.

In HCISD's board of trustees races, Courtney Runkle leads Richard W. Cronshey with 164 votes to 89 votes for the District 3 seat. For an at large trustee position, incumbent Will McManus leads the race with 704 ballots. Donyé Curry trails with 474 votes.

There were also six bond propositions submitted by HCISD to voters, totaling some $238.5 million. Here are descriptions of the propositions and early voting totals for each.

  • Proposition A: There were 743 votes for the proposition, or 55.32%, and 600 votes against it.

    • The issuance of $147,959,876 school building bonds to accommodate school district growth. Key elements of the proposition include middle school and elementary school expansions, a new elementary school, Live Oak Academy renovations and 28 new school buses. Additional features of the proposition include two new tennis courts at Lehman High School, design fees for another elementary school, musical instruments for a new orchestra program and band replacements, and land purchases for future facilities and schools.



  • Proposition B: There were 736 votes for the proposition, or 54.84%, and 606 votes against it.

    • The issuance of $41,047,216 school building bonds for renovating and rehabilitating district assets. The proposition's largest expenses are for campus HVAC and fire alarm systems, campus roofing and flooring, and rehabilitation projects. Other aspects of the propositions include keyless entry and intercom upgrades, playground shade structure, hardscape improvements and miscellaneous rehabilitation projects, such as gym bleachers theater lighting.



  • Proposition C: There were 813 votes against the proposition, or 60.67%, and 527 votes for it.

    • The issuance of $12,784,128 in school building bonds for stadium expansions at Lehman High School and Johnson High School. Stadiums at both schools would have their capacities increased to 4,200 seats, and include projects related to concessions and team rooms. Lehman High School's scoreboard would be replaced as well as a retaining wall on the west end of the stadium.



  • Proposition D: There were 800 votes against the proposition, or 59.57%, and 543 votes for it.

    • The issuance of $4,268,873 in school building bonds for stadium improvements, such as additional Shelton Stadium parking and Lehman High School Baseball and Softball Complex improvements. Shelton would get a competition-size band practice area if the proposition is approved.



  • Proposition E: There were 745 votes against the proposition, or 55.56%, and 596 votes for it.

    • The issuance of $29,820,598 school building bonds for the construction of a Central Administration Building and renovation of the existing central office. All of the central office would be housed in one building complex, which would include relocating staff working out of Live Oak Academy and allowing the school to expand.



  • Proposition F: There were 786 votes for the proposition, or 58.66%, and 554 votes against it.

    • The issuance of $2,578,000 school building bonds for technology infrastructure and mobile devices for teaching, virtual learning and online state assessments. Infrastructure upgrades and expansions would impact the storage area network, wide area network, firewall, storage and data center needs of future district growth.




In early voting, there were 4,948 ballots cast, which represents 3.51% of Hays County's 141,065 voters.

Totals from ballots cast May 1 have yet to be released. Polls closed at 7 p.m., though voters who were in line at 7 p.m. were still able to cast ballots. Community Impact Newspaper will update this article as more election day vote totals are released.
By Warren Brown
Warren joined Community Impact at the beginning of 2020 as the editor of its New Braunfels paper and now reports the news in San Marcos, Buda and Kyle. Warren previously wrote for the Dallas Observer and Fort Worth Weekly and he brings a passion for truth and equality to his reporting.


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