Float Fest 2019 canceled due to rain-related construction delays

Organizers of the annual Float Fest announced June 21 that this year’s event, set to take place July 20-22, has been canceled.

“This was a difficult decision to make, but due to several recent roadblocks outside of our control and in an effort to do right by our fans, the decision to cancel the event was the best option,” a post on the Float Fest Facebook page stated. “We have been working around the clock to prepare the new festival site in Gonzales, but at this time we don’t feel the grounds are ready to fully showcase everything Float Fest is about.”

Float Fest was relocated this year from Martindale, where it was held in previous years, to Gonzales after Guadalupe County commissioners in January decided against issuing a permit for the event. Organizers of the festival had struggled in previous years to reach an agreement with Guadalupe County about the number of attendees, in part due to concerns about traffic and noise.

According to the announcement, full refunds will be issued to anyone who has already purchased tickets.
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