Pflugerville City Council honors outgoing members Jeff Marsh, Jim McDonald

“It takes pride, it takes heart to serve in your roles," Mayor Victor Gonzales said. "You’ve gone above and beyond to serve the call of duty.” (Kelsey Thompson/Community Impact Newspaper)
“It takes pride, it takes heart to serve in your roles," Mayor Victor Gonzales said. "You’ve gone above and beyond to serve the call of duty.” (Kelsey Thompson/Community Impact Newspaper)

“It takes pride, it takes heart to serve in your roles," Mayor Victor Gonzales said. "You’ve gone above and beyond to serve the call of duty.” (Kelsey Thompson/Community Impact Newspaper)

Pflugerville City Council honored the contributions of outgoing council members Jeff Marsh and Jim McDonald Nov. 10, with Mayor Victor Gonzales referring to their departures from council as bittersweet.

“You’ve had an impact in our community and you’re helping move our city in the right way," Gonzales said.

Marsh began serving as Place 2 on Pflugerville City Council in September 2016, while McDonald joined council as Place 6 in November 2017. Marsh announced in July he would not seek re-election, while McDonald's challenger, David Rogers, was elected to Place 6 during the Nov. 3 election.

Mayor Pro Tem Omar Peña said Marsh and McDonald's impact on Pflugerville extend beyond the votes they cast on city decisions, but affected the way the council functioned as a whole. Peña said Marsh and McDonald forced the council to think more deeply on various issues, opening the body up to newfound perspectives and broadening its horizons.

Council Member Doug Weiss congratulated McDonald on a term well served, and commended him for his dedications to both his constituents and his convictions. Weiss said that Marsh, as the youngest member ever elected to council, continually ensured council's choices represent the citizens of Pflugerville, and not just its members' personal perspectives.


Council members Rudy Metayer and Mike Heath each highlighted the friendship Marsh and McDonald forged with one another—never without some healthy debate. The deepening of their friendship spoke volumes of each of their characters, Metayer said.

Marsh, in addressing McDonald, said both of them joined council on opposite ends of the dais: both physically where they were seated, and ideologically, where their opinions lied. However, despite those differences, Marsh said they often voted in line with one another, united by the commitment to their community.

McDonald echoed Marsh's sentiments, adding conscience over political motivations was always at the forefront of their votes cast.

“Serving on the dais has been the highlight of my life and it has been a privilege," McDonald said.

In honor of their efforts, Gonzales said both outgoing members were presented with a plaque and a Pflugerville city street sign to commemorate their dedication to council—a small testament, Gonzales said, to a lifetime's worth of influence on the city.

“It takes pride, it takes heart to serve in your roles," Gonzales said. "You’ve gone above and beyond to serve the call of duty.”


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