Update: Valero pipeline pivots from Hutto to Taylor

The city of Hutto rejected a proposed project to run a Valero pipeline through the city's extraterritorial jurisdiction.

The city of Hutto rejected a proposed project to run a Valero pipeline through the city's extraterritorial jurisdiction.

Two months after Hutto city officials denied a proposed project to construct a Valero pipeline in Hutto’s extraterritorial jurisdiction, the energy company has turned to Taylor for the new site of its pipeline and terminal.

Taylor City Council will vote Thursday night to approve or deny the project, which would bring a Valero fuel distribution terminal and a connecting pipeline to the city. If the resolution passes, Valero would acquire approximately 88 acres of land in two separate parcels. The largest parcel of land, measured at 58 acres, is located on Chandler Road west of FM 366 in Taylor’s ETJ, while the second parcel of land is located south of Chandler Road.

The new pipeline proposal comes after Valero and Hutto city officials failed to find an adequate location for the terminal and pipeline.

“Every deal isn’t a good deal for us. It just didn’t make sense for us,” Hutto City Manager Odis Jones said. “We had several residential areas by that site and a [future] high school and middle school being built. With the alternative sites we found, it made better sense to make it out in Taylor.”

Valero projected a combined construction cost $200 million for the pipeline and storage facility. The energy company also said the pipeline and terminals would generate approximately 350 development and construction jobs and strengthen the tax base of communities near the pipeline route and terminals.

Hutto city officials said in the past that residents expressed concern over the pipeline project moving forward in Hutto. The proposal was ultimately rejected by city officials due to environmental concerns and belief that the pipeline would have an "adverse effect" to the quality of life of Hutto residents.

“We’re excited for Taylor. We think it’s a good opportunity for Taylor and we think it’s a good opportunity for Valero,” Jones said.
By Iain Oldman
Iain Oldman joined Community Impact Newspaper in 2017 after spending two years in Pittsburgh, Pa., where he covered Pittsburgh City Council. His byline has appeared in PublicSource, WESA-FM and Scranton-Times Tribune. Iain worked as the reporter for Community Impact Newspaper's flagship Round Rock/Pflugerville/Hutto edition and is now working as the editor for the Northwest Austin edition.


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