Pflugerville ISD approves 1-year extension, 3% salary raise for superintendent

Superintendent Douglas Killian’s base salary during the 2019-20 school year was listed as $250,001, per data provided by the Texas Education Agency. (Iain Oldman/Community Impact Newspaper)
Superintendent Douglas Killian’s base salary during the 2019-20 school year was listed as $250,001, per data provided by the Texas Education Agency. (Iain Oldman/Community Impact Newspaper)

Superintendent Douglas Killian’s base salary during the 2019-20 school year was listed as $250,001, per data provided by the Texas Education Agency. (Iain Oldman/Community Impact Newspaper)

Pflugerville ISD Superintendent Douglas Killian’s contract with the district has been extended an additional year following a unanimous vote from the PfISD board of trustees Sept. 3.

Killian's previously negotiated contract, formalized in September 2019, outlined his term from July 1, 2019 through June 30, 2024. Following board action Sept. 3, his contractual term has been extended through June 2025.

The board also approved a 3% salary raise for Killian in conjunction with the district increase included in the now-adopted fiscal year 2020-21 budget. Killian’s base salary during the 2019-20 school year was listed as $250,001, per data provided by the Texas Education Agency.

The announcement came as PfISD teachers and staff have continued to voice concerns about the district’s anticipated return to optional in-person learning Sept. 14.

PfISD is currently expected to welcome up to 25% functional capacity Sept. 14, with capacity limitations enacted on student populations only. Up to 100% of teachers may return to an on-campus forum under the district’s functional capacity restrictions.


Several staff members referenced a mid-week staff email sent by Superintendent Douglas Killian on Sept. 2 to which some voiced opposition and offense during the board’s Sept. 3 workshop. Community Impact Newspaper has filed an open records request for the emails referenced during the meeting.

Daniel Dawer, who has worked as a teacher for 11 years, said he hopes this year is not his last. In addressing the board of trustees Sept. 3, Dawer said he was appalled the workshop was held in person and that it limited commenters to in-person options only.

Dawer said the Texas Education Agency’s additional four-week waiver extension does not require 25% on-campus capacity, and he criticized PfISD’s decision to only calculate student populations in that capacity cap. He added district leadership have ignored and dismissed concerns expressed regarding the district’s return-to-learn plan.

“Choices have consequences,” he said.

David Lund, a bus driver for PfISD, commended the district’s efforts last year, adding he and his colleagues do their best to ensure the safety of all students. However, he said many drivers have immunocompromised spouses or their own health conditions with which they are dealing.

“If we are able to use four more weeks, why would it not be sensible to use them?” he said.

Christin Hamman, a PfISD teacher, criticized the board’s decision to resume in-person learning Sept. 14 and said that she believes Killian has not fully vetted the potential dangers a return to on-campus instruction could pose for teachers, staff and students alike.

“[Our fear] is not the unknown,” she said. “It’s the unprepared.”

Following approval of Killian’s contract extension and salary increase, Board President Vernagene Mott said the district “has always supported continuous improvement” in its education initiatives. She added that while there are target areas the district will work to enhance, Killian and his administration have worked since the pandemic hit in March to serve students in this new normal of public education.

“The board has recognized Dr. Killian has done some great things this rating period,” trustee Brian Allen said. “Also, we have some things to work on and have charged the superintendent to get after that.”


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