Over 1 million surgical masks a day: Armbrust American sets up shop in Pflugerville

Lloyd Armbrust, founder and CEO of Armbrust American, developed an automated system to produce surgical face masks at a Pflugerville facility. (Taylor Jackson Buchanan/Community Impact Newspaper)
Lloyd Armbrust, founder and CEO of Armbrust American, developed an automated system to produce surgical face masks at a Pflugerville facility. (Taylor Jackson Buchanan/Community Impact Newspaper)

Lloyd Armbrust, founder and CEO of Armbrust American, developed an automated system to produce surgical face masks at a Pflugerville facility. (Taylor Jackson Buchanan/Community Impact Newspaper)

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One fully-automated assembly line creates 120 masks a minute. (Taylor Jackson Buchanan/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Armbrust American intends to produce in-demand personal protective equipment and to create opportunities for strategic manufacturing in the United States, said founder Lloyd Armbrust. (Taylor Jackson Buchanan/Community Impact Newspaper)
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The sterile production facility is FDA certified to produce medical-grade masks, Armbrust said. (Courtesy Armbrust American)
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Armbrust American is ramping up production efforts to create 1.2 million masks per day. (Taylor Jackson Buchanan/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Online sales launched May 19 and include sample packs of 10 masks, boxed sets of 25 masks and boxed sets of 50 masks at this time. (Taylor Jackson Buchanan/Community Impact Newspaper)
In a 15,000-square-foot facility near SH 130, an assembly line of machinery creates 120 surgical masks a minute. As the prototype proves successful, Lloyd Armbrust, founder and CEO of Armbrust American, plans to ramp up production to 1.2 million masks a day.

“Typically, masks are made manually,” Armbrust said. “I realized I could speed up production and eliminate the high costs associated with labor by automating the process.”

As the world grapples with the coronavirus pandemic, personal protective equipment such as surgical masks is in short supply. Armbrust saw the emerging need and launched a new business within a matter of months.

“In December, I started hearing about a viral pneumonia-like outbreak in China,” Armbrust said. “With virtually all the masks being produced in China, I wondered what the world would do if the virus were to spread.”

By automating a manufacturing process that is manual elsewhere, Armbrust has solved a riddle that bedevils many: how to produce high quality, low cost products at a high volume.


“Our lab uses automation to turn raw materials into quality surgical masks,” he said. “Our difference is in the quality of manufacturing and the sterile handling of the materials.”

For Armbrust, the business is also distinctly patriotic.

“I know I can make masks as cheaply as China can,” Armbrust said. “I have automation, and they don’t. And I have vertical integration. If I’m bringing the raw materials in and having face masks come out the other side, that’s the key to making the costs be really low.”

One measure of the success of his business, Armbrust said, will be the day an American company does not have to choose between a low-cost mask made abroad and a higher-cost one made in the United States, he said.

"We don’t need a bailout," he said. "We don’t need other countries. We need the finest quality products with the most effective materials, full supply chain control, and no foreign dependence. We need made in America, made in Texas.”

He said he started testing his automated process May 6. Less than two weeks later, on May 19, he launched online sales. Current inventory includes sample packs of 10 masks, boxed sets of 25 masks and boxed sets of 50 masks.

“I’ve had so many people say they’re still having difficulties finding masks,” he said. “I just want to get masks in peoples’ hands.”

Armbrust believes the need for face masks has a future. He said he thinks health care workers, construction workers and even individuals who are not required to wear protective equipment for their jobs will continue to purchase masks well into the future.

“While this crisis was our launching point, I think demand will continue to grow,” he said.

As he invests in the area and looks to transform ways of “old manufacturing thinking,” Armbrust said he hopes his business has staying power in the Austin area.

“I’ve made Texas my home,” Armbrust said. “I always felt this deep bond here. It is really personally exciting to build this business here in Texas. I hope that this is the start of something big, something long-lasting, a cornerstone of the area.”

Armbrust American

3813A Helios Way, Pflugerville

512-807-0744

www.armbrustusa.com
By Taylor Jackson Buchanan
Taylor Buchanan joined Community Impact Newspaper in 2018 after completing a master of journalism degree from the University of Texas. She worked as the senior reporter for Community Impact's Southwest Austin edition and is now the editor for the company's flagship Round Rock/Pflugerville/Hutto edition.


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